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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!
I received my first baby p-let last week, and am wondering about his wings. When i got him i noticed that only one of his wings are clipped.
All of the flight feathers on his right wing are clipped (fresh clip, only 2 weeks old) and not a single feather on his left wing. this is presenting problems for us when we get frightened but furthermore, i am wondering if he even had a chance to learn to fly... most importantly LAND, before getting clipped. Now, my bird was sent across the country, so i understand why he would be clipped before going to a new home, but i find myself rather confused by this breeders methods.
Every time he gets frightened, and flutters off, he dosent land.. he cant even slow himself he just bumps into the wall. Ouch! :(
its terrible and i am not sure what i should do about it. Having only had him home for a few days, i feel like its too early to towl him and clip the other wing, let alone i am not sure i want to clip his wings anyway.
Also, he now has irritated skin above his beak, it has scabbed a bit, i am wondering if i should try to treat that with something? :confused:
anybody have any advice? i am terribly confused.
 

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IF he is brand new to you, was just shipped cross country, and his wings are clipped as poorly as you describe, I'd have to serious recommend finding a reputable avian vet in your area and make an appointment asap.
It would be a good idea under much better conditions, but with the situation you describe, especially the scabby cere, I don't think you'd better waste any time.
It might cost as much as $50 for a checkup and clipping, but I'm assuming you paid much more than that for your little guy and want to ensure he's in good health.
It sounds like he might have been bred by someone that really didn't know what they were doing or care about the birds health so long as they made a sale. Hopefully I'm wrong, but you know what $%%^ people can be when there's a buck to be made.
Have the vet look him over and get his wings clipped evenly. After that you can either let them grow out or continue to keep them clipped as you see fit.
 

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Hi Eileen – I can’t comment on the skin above the beak only to say it might be time for his first vet visit to check him out.

Even though I am not an advocate of wing clipping in your case I would clip the other side as soon as possible.

Like you I am dumfounded at this breeders practices. When a bird tries to fly with only one side clipped they veer off to one side sometimes even turning completely around – this is dangerous as the bird lands in a completely different place than they are aiming for. It’s quite hazardous to the bird.

Since your bird is young he won’t begin to re-grow in his flight feathers until his first molt at 5 months – So I would clip the other side right away and they will start to grow in again around the same time.

It’s hard to say if your breeder let the youngsters fledge –

Make an Avian Vet appointment to view his scab and they will clip his wings for you also.
 

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I agree that the other wing should be clipped. Can you imagine how disorienting it would be to be clipped on just one side and be unable to fly straight? Dangerous, too! Ask the breeder if your baby ever fledged-- you need to know.

My bird banged her cere once-- had a bump, but it was healed in two or three days-- quicker than I could get her to a vet as a non-emergency. It was never hot, red, or angry looking. If it had been, I would have had the receptionist inform the vet so he would be able to make a call on its urgency.
 

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That is too bad about the awful clip. Very dangerous. Hopefully you can find a great vet to help even it out at least. Getting banged up is painful and so dangerous.
 

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I too would clip the other side. I've tried clipping and not clipping and i believe the quality of my relationship with my fid is better when clipped (and safer). I realize some don't approve of this, but for my very inquisitive bird, it was necessary as he kept flying into dangerous areas and also into mirrors and windows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks

Thanks everybody.
I really appreciate the input.
I was a little leery of clipping after only having my Sora home for 5 days, but he seemed fine. Scared, but he did alright, and didnt hold it against me! What a relief!
Landing is MUCH easier now!
His cere seems to be on the mend as well. When i got him it looked fine, but my boyfiend let him out of the travel container to transfer him to the cage we had made up... and needless to say, we had a bit of an incident.
That is when he bumped it, dosent obstruct his breathing or anything, I was just curious if anybody had any suggestions as to whether or not I can treat it with anything.. neosporin or any aloe maybe... ?
Thanks again.

 

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I wouldn't use neosporin or any preparation meant for people or other pets. It could get up his nostrils, onto his feathers, or be more irritating to birdie skin than nothing at all. The only thing I've seen recommended for scrapes is pure aloe vera gel. This does not mean aloe vera gel from a bottle or tube; those have preservatives and other garbage added to them. I have a bottle that says 100%* Aloe Vera Gel on the front and on the back there's a * and a long list of chemicals!!! The way to use aloe is to cut a bit off the live plant, snip off the spines so nobody gets snagged, and use the gell from inside. I wouldn't use it unless the skin were actually broken, and maybe not then, considering the stress potential.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So you wouldnt recomend using aloe from the leaf?
i guess my problem is that i feel bad about him having this injury :( , i feel like i should try and help it heal faster if i can.
Parhaps i should just let it be.
Thanks.
 

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Aloe from the leaf is the only thing I would use on a bird's sore. The reason I am not sure that I would do anything to a bird that is healing fine without help is because I would not want to unnecessairly stress the bird. If the bird is not showing you that the spot is bothersome, it would be surprised and confused if you started putting goo on it. That might be a set back in the trust department.

I imagine that your giving the spot too much attention could even make the bird nervous about it and it would start rubbing or scratching at the spot-- or the bird could start irritating the spot from trying to get goo off of it. One trick to get a dog to leave a spot alone is to give another spot a lot of attention with frequent inspections, salves, and bandages. The dog's attention is diverted from the real problem, and it spends its time licking the new spot instead of irritating the old one. So, if the spot is healing on its own and doesn't look infected, I'd leave it alone. Birds have high metabolisms, so they heal up pretty fast on their own.

If you're able, you could post a picture of the sore place and let others say what they think they would do.

If you feel that you must give the spot attention, a tiny bit of fresh aloe gel on your finger lightly touched to the spot is the only topical I would do-- you only want to leave a thin film, not a glob.
 

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I highly recommend not messing around with home remedies unless you are very experienced.

You may injure the bird more or damage its feathers if a gel gets on them and you could create more of a problem.

If the bird is injured or ill take it to an avian vet.

I know some people don’t want to do this because of the expense but its part of our responsibility as pet owners.
 
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