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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, so I've had my parrotlet for 3 weeks now and she's really shy to get out of her cage. There aren't any signs of aggression coming from her, but she just hops and flies about away from my hand. I don't want to force her out by grabbing her or getting her too flustered. Most times she'll get so jumpy she flies out on her own, but I find the whole ordeal to be kinda stressful.

Once she's out, she's a darling. She'll get scritches and play time and I let her fly around the room, and she'll rarely want to leave my shoulder.

How should I have a better way of getting her out? She doesn't even seem interested to come out on her own, I've read about parrots who do the please dance or something, but she's just so content in her cage. Help!
 

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Three weeks is almost no time at all in terms of bird ownership. Your parrotlet is still adjusting to her new home and the one place she feels safe is in her cage. Think in terms of how long it takes you to acclimate to a completely new situation when you've moved away from everything familiar.

I would leave the cage door open and let her come out on her own when she's ready to do so. You may try putting some interesting toys or food on the outside of her cage as an incentive to come out to check what's there. Trying to grab her and take her out is only going to make her more fearful. I agree it's stressful for all concerned.

Back off a bit and let her take the lead.
 

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I would suggest encouraging her to come out with food. Try not to chase her around the cage too, that is stressful also. Nobody wants to be chased out of the cage either. I used millet to inch my guys closer to my hand and slowly work them closer to the cage door.
 

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I know how you feel. I'm still trying to get my boy out of his cage. I've had Zeus since Feb 27th. Sometimes I just want to grab him, but I know thats not the right thing to do.

I've been using millet to get him use to me. Holding a sprigg of millet in my hand, I move it slowly toward him. Sometimes he will move away, sometimes he want. If he moves away I'll just hold my hand in one place untill he comes back. If it looks like he is not comimg back I will slowly move my hand back toward the cage door. Then wait until he settles back down on a perch. When he does, then I start the process all over again. I only use millet for training. I never give it to him for a snack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey guys thanks for all the responses. I've tried millet and though that worked initially, since she's been weaned, it hasn't been all that effective. Of course I don't want to force her out, but I'm conflicted because I know she needs some time out to stretch her wings a little and also, when I need to clean the cage and stuff.

I've tried using dowels to get her out, but she's aggressive towards that and not my fingers! I haven't actually grabbed her out before. Like I said, she gets flustered and ends up flying out of the cage anyway. And once she's out, she's totally chill. I put her on her playpen or my desk with some toys and she's fine.

I don't know what else to do now! I know that it's been only a short time but I wish I could at least make the times that I actually HAVE to get her out of the cage (cleaning etc) more pleasant. =(
 

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I feel the same as you, Quorra. I don't know what else to do except contining with what I'm doing. But I feel bad that he nevers come out of his cage. I'm thinking about opening the cage door & see if he'll come out on his own.
 

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When I first had Saturday she wouldn't come out of her cage, so I took all the treats out of her cage for a full day - she only had pellets and water (at the time she wouldn't eat fresh food yet). Then the next day I showed up with some millet in my hand and she sidled right up to me. She wouldn't come to me for something she already had in her cage, but when I was the only source of her favorite treat, everything changed.

Also, there's always clicker training. This video gives a good rundown - it's about a biting bird, but the technique could easily be altered for a shy bird. Watch the part where the bird targets inside the cage - you could have her target around her cage, and eventually target her way out the door. If she won't take a treat from your hand, you can drop it into a dish or cup where she can see it and get it without having to deal with you. Maybe some straightforward positive reinforcement is all she needs.
 
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