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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Okay, for the guide, I need help on "First time shopping list",
for when the owners first bring their parrotlet home.
Please help me list EVERYTHING they need.

Also, what do you guys think is the minimum size cage for a single parrotlet (height, width, depth)

And, any reccomendations on a good regular bird seed brand?
Any other brands for other good products?

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So far for the not-so-complete list:)p), I have:
cuttlebone
mineral block
regular cockatiel or small hookbill seed [good brand]
fresh vegetables
fresh fruits
dry oats
toys [different types]
millet spray
perches [different types]
many bowls for offering foods
corn cob or litter for bottom of cage
something to cover cage with [towel, etc.]
treats for bird

and many more that I can not think of at this point. Please help :)
((items in "[]" denote specifics that I need your help with))
 

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Don't forget:

-natural light or bird bulb to emitate
-playstand
-Good sized cage

That is all I thought of. You can go to Andrea's caresheet. It has a whole list of what you need to have for a parrotlet. I suggest you look at that. I am still completing the list. I got 3 more things to accomplish from that list.

~** I feed Kiwi A Parakeet brand (wild harvest) mixed with Wild Harvest Cockateil blend. He barely get sunflowers because those are fattening.
 

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Hi Nick -- I use 3-D Pet Products seed -- I find it has the least amount of dust than other brands. Kiwi does go for fresh veggies, egg, fruit and occasionally birdie bread so the seed is basically if I'm away for an extended time (which is not often).

for the list, you might want to suggest a cozy hut and/or slinky for the cage. Kiwi loved her slinky when we first brought her home and slept there most nights. Then she moved over to her cozy hut that I put her in after our bedtime routine.
Another thing that is nice is the coiled rope that you can hang from the top..she enjoys running up and down on that.

for perches, I have rope, regular wood, cactus, and a natural wood perch. I have one of the cement perches to help with keeping her nails trimmed. The swing along has that material.

For the cage, Kiwi did start off in a smaller cage that she uses in my office and she seems to still enjoy it a bit more. But I recently changed her over to a wider cage in order to supply more toys and room to play.

I also just received a bird kabob for Kiwi. You can spear a chuck of corn on the cob, brocoli, apple chuck, etc...you can hang it in the cage and they have something healthy to eat and also to play with. Of course, you have to clean off the bars after they're done flinging their food!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Mustang99! :)

My parrotlets also love the slinky! They bounce on it, and now Oscar sleeps on the end of one of them, next to the wall of the cage.
They both also love the coil rope which hangs from the top. That has always been Oscar's favorite place to sleep, which he did every night.
Once I put Maya with him, he attacked her when she stepped foot on it.

But, now Mr.Oscar lets her sleep on it while he sleeps on the slinky.
...how nice of him :D

I will be sure to include those items and brands. :)

Again, thanks.
 

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Nick,

Current thinking from those that I have spoken with is that Ionizers are bad. Back in '99, which is around the time they were first heavily marketed, people thought they were a cure-all.

Actually, there are both negative and positive ions one type is actually bad for humans as well as birds, but I don't remember which at the moment, so if you use one do a little homework on this for yourself as well to make sure it's the right kind.

Regards,

Art S.
 

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O!

And those mite protecters that ties on to your cage.
 

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Thanks Mustang :D

I will take it out right away. I didnt know that all.

Thanks once again.
 

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i have to admit that i have become more diligent with the parakeets since Kiwi came on board. Not that they were neglected in any way but as i learn and study a lot more, they definitely benefit. It's great to have this forum to bounce things off everyone. helps us stay on top of everything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
About the ionizers, here is a good site:
http://www.multiscope.com/hotspot/bird_breeders_lung.htm

I would like to share with you a good paragraph:

What's Wrong with Ionizers and Ozone Generators?


IMPORTANT: DO NOT EVEN CONSIDER AN IONIZER NO MATTER WHAT THE COMMERICIALS TELL YOU!!!

Not all machines claiming to be air purifiers will clean the air. We believe that only air purifiers that capture and retain particulates (like HEPA units do) are effective. Do not be tricked into buying a machine without filters. If there is no filter, the particles cannot be removed.

The units that boast of requiring no filter changes are the ionizers like Sharper Image's Ionic Breeze or ozone generators such as the Living Air Classic. Unfortunately, not only are they not effective in removing pollutants, they generate dangerous levels of ozone. Ozone changes lung tissue in humans and birds and triggers asthma attacks in people who have asthma. Ozone is especially damaging to children.
These units have no fans to draw air and have no filters to catch particles. The Ionic Breeze traps a very small amount of dust on its plates as long as the plates are cleaned very frequently. The Living Air Classic doesn't even do that. Although these manufacturers would have you believe that the chlorine-like smell their units produce is a good thing, in fact that is the by-product of ozone.
According to the EPA, ionizers are not effective in removing particles, chemicals or odors and, to add insult to injury, generate unwanted ozone. The EPA states:
"When inhaled, ozone can damage the lungs. Relatively low amounts can cause chest pain, coughing, shortness of breath, and, throat irritation. Ozone may also worsen chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and compromise the ability of the body to fight respiratory infections."
Both the EPA and the American Lung Association are very clear about the dangers of ozones -- any amount of it. Both organizations recommend HEPA units that do not generate ozone to clean indoor air.


Recommendation

If you own birds, you need an air purifier. To be effective, you'll need something with both good particle filtration and a significant amount of carbon. Here are a few excellent choices:
(you can see the "excellent choices" on the website via the link above.)
 

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Thanks for the info on the purifiers. I have two Hamilton Beach Hepa air purifiers that have worked nicely. One is in the bird's room and I purchased another for our bedroom just to help my husband with his allergies. He has been a real trooper with the birds since he knew that there would be birds in the house from the day he met me.
 
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