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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I have finally found the perfect place to buy a p'let baby from. However, the drive is 5 hours, something I simply cannot do (gas prices:mad:) Anyway, I am terrified of having a live animal shipped through the mail to my house. Is it traumatizing to the bird? Is it safe/fatal? Is it morally ok? I've heard the horror stories, and I trust that the breeder is a good breeder, but I am still reluctant with shipping. Please tell me all about shipping p'lets, pros and cons, and if its ok for the animal. I know virtually nothing and I'm really scared to do anything without knowing everything and anything that could or will happen to the baby bird. Also, would it be better just to drive up there? I don't know if they allow people to see the p'lets... Thanks!
 

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I think you should check how much it would cost to drive versus the cost of shipping. Shipping is fine. Lots of people have shipped with no problems. I had a problem with some babies I was buying and getting a flight lined up. I drove 9 hours each way to get them and the gas cost just a bit more than the shipping would have. You may find that it will be similar price or less to just drive to get them, if you have the time, that is.
 

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I had my conure shipped. It wasn't "to my door"...But I had to pick her up at the airport. It went well and was a overal 3hour time span she was at the airport, flying and then landing. If the breeder you are dealing with ships they should know how to properly ship. Depending on your location, shipping right now may not be possible because of weather conditions. So I would double check if you go that way. I'm in canada, and I believe they ship till the end of november, then start back up in march/april. This could vary depending on the airline, and your location.

Either way, I was pleased with the shipping. My conure was 8hr drive away from me, one way. It was cheaper and less time consuming to ship her. The breeder put seed and apples in the container along with wrapping it with burlap to prevent less drafts and from her seeing to much and getting spooked.

My only tips would be, trust the breeder you are dealing with. If something seems fishy, don't go through with it. Also, the only down side to shipping is that you aren't able to see the baby before hand, or handle it. This would have to be the trust thing again. I have known a lot of people who have been ripped off, paying for older birds, breeder birds when they were told they were handtame babies. Or paying and not ever receiving their bird whatsoever.

The breeder I got my conure from what highly rated and advertised on many parrot groups. I also knew several people who got birds off this breeder and were very happy. So it took away a lot of the stresses, knowing I was dealing with someone professional.

Good luck
 

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I am terrified of having a live animal shipped through the mail to my house.
Shipping exotic parrots via the Post Office (US mail) is illegal. I know some breeders will take the chance but the penalties are very stiff if you get caught. Shipping via the airlines is roughly $100.00 so check your options that way. I've safely shipped many birds by Continental Airlines and have never had any problems.
 

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I didn't even catch the through the mail part ... sorry about that. Yeah, they don't ship through the mail, but through the airport :) You can ship chickens through the mail (and I have done that back when I raised Serema chickens), but that's about it!

If this breeder ships through the mail, FIND A DIFFERENT BREEDER. As Callie said, it is illegal. Bird shipping boxes for the postal service are also generally cardboard. How many parrots are going to stay in a cardboard box? Too much of a risk of not only getting caught, but losing the bird.
 

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Bird shipping boxes for the postal service are also generally cardboard. How many parrots are going to stay in a cardboard box?
Generally, the shipping boxes are provided by the shipper (even when using USPS), so if a bird is shipped in a cardboard box, that's the way it was taken to the Post Office. To ship via the airlines, an airline approved carrier is required, in addition to other requirements that can vary from airline to airline. Delta Dash has temperature restrictions, while Continental does not. The difference is in the set up of the plane that carries the live shipments.
 

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The bird shipping boxes we used for the chickens were specialty boxes approved by the post office, as they require filters over the air holes on the boxes (at least for adult chickens). They had handles on top where they folded shut and filters over all the air holes, but were cardboard. There may be more options, but I haven't been able to find a USPS approved bird shipping box that was not cardboard. I realize that the shipper provides the box, but you can't just stick a bird in any old box and expect the post office to accept it.

Regardless, the point is that parrots should not be shipped USPS.
 

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I would be tempted to have a p'let shipped, but much prefer to see the bird. 5 hours isn't awful, and if you get an early start, not so bad. I got a p'let in Fl., and it was about the same 5-hour time to get him home. We stopped at McD., and got some water for him, which he drank. He had millet in his carrier. He was a sweetie---RIP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
lindav, I'm sorry about your parrotlet passing away, but its great that you have a new hen! How do you know the p'lets personality before you have it shipped to you, though? I trust the breeder, but I'm a little on edge about the bird itself.
 
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