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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi there,
First of all, I'm a new member on this forum and I'd like to say hi to everyone here! =)

I've had my lil boy for only 2 days, and the first day I put him in his cage he was skittish and on guard. I put water and millet in there to encourage him to eat because he's young (9 weeks I think but not sure) and his breeder told me that he needs to be kept on millet for a little while, then transitioned to seed mix. I've put him in a quiet corner of the room and left a perch and a one toy in his cage as so to not overwhelm him, and cover his cage at night so he can sleep well. Today he was a little less nervous and climbed around for a bit, but seems to be lunging at me, stretching out his neck and opening his beak wide, when I approach his cage to talk to him. I also try to put my hand into the cage, first just holding it motionless close to him, progressing slowly to petting his back. He'll bite me, or try to bite, but I pretend I'm oblivious to his nips or blow gently on his face when he lunges/nips and he stops doing it eventually. I never keep these petting sessions more than 2 mins long for fear of stressing him out. I was told by his breeder that he was the friendliest of the clutch, so I'm a bit worried, but I also know I can't expect him to warm up so fast.
My question is...should I continue approaching him and getting him used to me this way and what can I do to make him more comfortable/less stressed out by the transition?

Much thanks for bearing with the long post =)

Lucy
 

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Hey Lucy I think your method shows real concern for his transistion and I think your on the right track..patience is always the best. Put yourself in it's little shoes and you will not go wrong. Others may disagree but after a while the realization that the biting does not affect you will stop some of it. Your p'let needs to be able to predict what your gonna do, animals read body language before what you say. Keep your routine and he will begin to read it and understand your intentions and know he shouldn't be scared. good luck.
 

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I Lucy – welcome and congratulations on your new Parrotlet.

I agree with Memmey, you are showing great concern for his wellbeing and are doing a great job. By keeping your sessions short he will come around. Sounds like you have done your homework and know what you are doing.

On the food: Yes, give him all the millet he wants now and leave seed and other foods in his cage for him – even if he ignores the foods, keep them available to him for when he does decide to explore and eat them they are available to him.

Keep us posted on how he comes along.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi there,

Okay, it's been a while since I posted an update.
I named the lil guy Pip (his eyes reminded me of apple pips and the name just jived) after I got him back home to my parent's house. Before that he had lived in rez with me for 1.5 months. Well, neither of my parents were thrilled that I had bought a $170 "budgie" at first, but they have totally been won over by his cute impish charms. My dad esp., as he'll carry Pip around on his shoulder or head and let him have the run of the living room. He's even carried him around kangaroo-like when he's wearing layered shirts so that pip is sandwiched close to his body between the two layers. All you see is this little bulging lump on his tummy that wiggles around every once in a while...I guess Pip enjoys the warmth. My parents have also established a bedroom routine in which they put Pip on his sleeping perch and tell him "go to sleep birdie" before they cover him up. Hopefully he'll understand and maybe even voluntarily repeat the phrase whenever we cover him up for the night.
In fact, my dad has made more progress with him in a few weeks than I had in a month and a half. Pip will now step onto our fingers when we put our hands into his cage and doesn't resist us taking him out. He'll climb around us instead of jumping or flying off and seems to enjoy running around outside when before he just wanted to return to his cage. It seems that the new cage, toys, and increased human interaction have done him a world of good and made him into a new plet. Plus he probably just loves being the center of attention. =P
I have a question about something that worries me though. I have a mirror pagoda toy in his cage that he seems to spend alot of time around, and I'm wondering if that would affect the bonding process at all? I've read some of the posts on this forum that seem to indicate that if you aren't spending a great deal of time with your bird, then a mirror may not be a good toy because it will cause him to bond with the image and thus be less attached to you. Can anyone suggest what I should do?

Thanks all for your informative suggestions!
Lucy
 

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Sounds like all is going well!! Great! I do not have a mirror, but when Chipper sees herself in a mirror she doesn't look at it. She has a cage in my bathroom where she plays while I get makeup on and bath and dress. A mirror is there.

Do you have lots of nice toys and gyms? We need some pictures!:D
 

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My bird became obsessed with a toy that had a small mirror built into the toy – he ignored other mirrors but this particular mirror on this particular toy he adored.

It may depend on how much time your bird gets to spend with humans. But if It’s less than half his day/nights I think he could become overly bonded with the mirror - especially when his hormones kick in.

My bird spent all day while I was at work with this toy/mirror and had two hours each night and weekends out of his cage but because the majority of his day was spent with the Mirror he became quite bonded to it - he also became quite frustrated.

He didn’t break the bond with the mirror until I added another real bird to his world :p

I personally don't think mirrors are good toys for pet birds because over time birds have a tendency to view the mirror as another bird but because they don’t get the appropriate reaction and responses from the ‘bird in the mirror’ it causes them frustration.


 
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