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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been going through random websites on Parrotlets, but they never tend to go into broad detail about the actual... taking home of a parrotlet. That and I had a few random questions picking around my head... sooo here goes!

1) What should you do when you first take your pet home?
2) Should I go find an avian vet? Is it 100% nessesary? I don't know if I have any around my area, but I won't hesitate to find one.
3) How should I handle it when I first take it home?
4) What kind of seed mixture should I feed it? Is budgie mix ok? What about pellets?
5) Clipped wings? Yes or no. I never clipped my budgies wings, but the owner I am getting my parrotlet from recommended I do.
6) Happy huts? I saw a few breeders with pictures of their birds with a happy hut kind of thing. I always thought the idea was cool, but I've read so many horror stories about it when I had my budgie. Opinions?
7) Water? Our tap water is safe for us to drink, would it be safe for the bird?
8) Feeding, how much do you feed per day?
9) Do they need any special mineral or vitamin mixture in their diet?
10) How are they with other animals... such as dogs or cats?

Ok that is all I can think of for now... hehe, sorry about the millions of questions ><
 

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1 & 3 depend on his/her age. Is the bird weened or will you still be hand feeding?

2. it's good to find a vet before you need him - check to make sure they have experience with birds as small as parrotlets. In the Health section there is a link to a list of vets, listed by state or province (Ontario is on the list).

4. This also depends on age, but I highly reccomend Harrisons pellets as a base and anything else that will not kill him/her as supplements/treats - the more you expose him/her to early in life, the less picky he/she will be (hopefully). Hunt around this site, there are lots of ideas and suggestions as to what to feed them.

5. I recommend that you start with clipped wings while the bird is bonding with you and getting to know it's new home. Once the bird is settled in, there are mixed opinions. We let ours be fully flighted.

6. I don't have an answer - but we use a cut-open sock draped over a couple of bars at the top of their cage going over a section of perch. This way, they get the same cozy effect but can still sit on the perch. Also, the poops drop though so the socks don't get soiled very quicky. The sock solution isn't as cute though.

7. Tap water should be fine. Though my wife insists on filtered water for the birds (she doesn't seem to mind me drinking tap water though ;) ).

8. There are may opinions on this, we like to leave non-spoiling food in their cages (more than they need) and suplement it with fresh stuff like sweet potato and veggies but these do not sit out all day.

9. I think Harrison's pellets already have suplements, our vet told us not to give any more beyond this.

10. this very much depends on the individual bird.

good luck,

Art S.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
He should be weened by the time I get him :)

So apart from the pellets, you don't feed them any seed?
 

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Stephen,

I would ask my vet if he filters then boils his drinking water. LOL Did your vet say why to boil it?

I do filter my water for myself and my animals, but it's just the filter on the sink that you turn the knob.
 

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They more than likely say to boil it to make sure that any parasites or any bacteria that may have slipped thru are killed. Boiling for 1 min will make the water safe.

I agree with the pellets, I only feed seed as a treat as well. You can give a small amount every day, but by small amount, I MEAN small. I'd say 1/2 a tsp per p'let at most in a day. Otherwise they get hooked and don't eat anything else. What does your breeder wean onto? I hope it's not seed or your in for a heck of a ride.....

Yes, you should find an avian vet. ANd being in Ontario, you've got probably about a bagillion choices too that shoudl be decently close. An avian vet has taken additional training on birds, and knows more than a regular vet. A regular vet only knows the very basics, and also probably doesn't get much of a chance to keep thier knowledge in use, since they see more cats and dogs or other animals. AN avian vet deals with birds all the time and will know exactly what to do in an emergency, without wasting valuable time. The choice for a vet can mean life and death for a bird.

Clipping wings, again, is a personal decision. Like Art said, it will help when the bird is first home. But a baby shoudl also be allowed to fledge and gain the muscle it needs to fly, or you could have health problems later. An unclipped bird also poses a danger in a home tho. It can fly into windows, doors, the toilet, bathtub, sink, pot of boiling water, frying pan. See what I mean? You need to be careful if you have a flighted bird in your home. ANd i mean VERY careful. They are so small too. Here, it depends on the bird. Our p'let's are flighted right now, but they are so untame at the moment that they don't come out a whole lot. When they do the door to the room is closed, and a blanket laid at the base so they can't walk under the gap there, then they can fly around the room as they please. But, they also have a very large cage that is more than accomadating to their needs and flying ability.

A happy hut should be fine for one bird. 2 birds and it will cause them to get hormonal and possibly breed, or try to breed. I don't have anything in my cage that my pair can view as a nesting site, because I don't want the problems of breeding. ANd the last thing I need is to have to find a suitable home for the babies. WIth a happy hut you should be checking it daily for tears or strings that the bird can get caught in. If you like, I have an alternative snuggly, with no strings to get caught in. No sewing either. Just fleece and some plastic chain.

You shouldn't give any extra supplements. If you are feeding a good diet, they will need nothing more. Plus, feeding too much of a vitamin or mineral is just as bad as them not getting enough, maybe worse. You won't have that problem if you stay away from the supplements. Also, you should have food available at all times. I personally don't ever keep track of how much my birds eat. I just put enough food in to last at least a couple days, and put fresh food (new pellets as well as fruit, veggies, grains and meats) in daily. I make a lot of food for my guys, and they eat almost everything that we do. But I am a stay at home mom, so I make almost everything from scratch. I know what goes in and know it's safe for the birds.

Birds are fine around other pets, but you should never leave an opportunity for them to be within striking distance of each other. A cat's saliva and scratches have deadly effects for a bird, and many a bird has died from a simple scratch because of the bacteria. Your birds should never be with another animal, no matter how cute it is, it is dangerous.
 

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Personally, I think everyone is going overboard with this boiling thing. In the wild, these birds drink water where they can find it - it hasn't been pre-boiled! They have an immune system, it's good to give it something to do - there is a reason why mountain men and ******** rarely get sick - its because they have been exposed to everything and have built up their immune system. By the way, this is mostly relevant to filtered, well or bottled water - in the US and Canada city water has chlorine to kill the bugs.

Now having said that, my wife had me install a reverse osmosis water filter which she uses for drinking water for herself and the birds. :cool:

Regards,

Art S.
 

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Alright Jeremiah Johnson your gonna get thrashed for that i can see it coming Your on your own buddy I'm out of here........









jo drinks tap water
 
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