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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve had my Parrotlet for about a month so far, the first couple days he would step on my finger and come out of the cage. Now if I stick my hand in the cage or anything in the cage to make him step up, he goes crazy and flies all around and eventually I stop and leave him in because I don’t want him to hurt himself. Any advice to getting my Parrotlet out of his cage? Thank you!
 

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Leave your cage door open and see what happens. If he is not trained to step up, how doe you get him back in the cage?

Never grab him or towel him unless it is absolutely necessary!

You said he would step up when you got him? Something must have happened to make him stop this. It could be anything, like a pet in the house, or people yelling around him or kids tapping on the cage., etc...

Be gentle and calm at all times until he settles down.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Leave your cage door open and see what happens. If he is not trained to step up, how doe you get him back in the cage?

Never grab him or towel him unless it is absolutely necessary!

You said he would step up when you got him? Something must have happened to make him stop this. It could be anything, like a pet in the house, or people yelling around him or kids tapping on the cage., etc...

Be gentle and calm at all times until he settles down.

Dave
I think he just became more attached to his cage. Because out of his cage, he’ll step up and be on me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think he just became more attached to his cage. Because out of his cage, he’ll step up and be on me.
Also I can’t leave the door open because I don’t want him flying on my dog! I have a Rottweiler
 

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The dog can be a big factor in your parrotlet's behavior. A Rottweiler normally has a strong prey drive, and a parrotlet is a small prey animal with strong instincts of self-preservation. If you want to build a relationship of trust, you need to provide a safe space for him to feel comfortable in. For any predator with such a strong prey drive, they need to be kept physically separated at all times. For predators with little or no prey drive (my mom's small dog won't even chase the rabbits in the yard - he watches them like they are his friends), you can with caution allow supervised time out together, but even with my mom's dog who doesn't chase squirrels they are always supervised when together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The dog can be a big factor in your parrotlet's behavior. A Rottweiler normally has a strong prey drive, and a parrotlet is a small prey animal with strong instincts of self-preservation. If you want to build a relationship of trust, you need to provide a safe space for him to feel comfortable in. For any predator with such a strong prey drive, they need to be kept physically separated at all times. For predators with little or no prey drive (my mom's small dog won't even chase the rabbits in the yard - he watches them like they are his friends), you can with caution allow supervised time out together, but even with my mom's dog who doesn't chase squirrels they are always supervised when together.
My Parrotlet oddly is not afraid of my Rottweiler, whenever she goes up to the cage my Parrotlet urges to get closer to her! Whenever I stick my hand in the cage is when my Parrotlet gets frightened, I’m not sure what changed exactly with him being afraid of my hands :/ I want him to get more used to me but I don’t know how to do that if I can’t get him out.
 

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Quick check - no nail polish, weird rings, or bandages? Many birds hate those things.

With a high prey drive dog, it is important to keep them away from the cage so that they won't go for the bird when an accident happens (the bird flies and the dog is out). We had a beagle, and if you know hounds you know that they cannot help wanting to smell everything and are very food motivated. He wanted to smell my bird, but I knew that if he were interested in the bird then he could easily (and accidently) kill her. So when he was a puppy I yelled at him every time he looked at the bird, establishing clear ownership over the bird. When he was older, the inevitable happened and she flew and literally landed on his back! And he stopped moving and stood perfectly still until I could rescue her. It felt mean yelling at a dog for just looking at the bird, but it saved my bird's life.

Parrotlets are weird about fear and trust. Be certain that you move your hand from below and not above, which triggers instinctual hawk fear. It is important to not grab a bird unless it is a matter of safety. Can you create a safe environment where you can open the door and wait until he comes out on his own? Also, just hanging out by the cage helps. Spend time talking, singing, or even just hanging out with him. Read to him. Show him that you are safe.
 
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