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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive always adored cockateils but was nervous because of their size, butt I've been thinking of expanding my tiny little flock by adding one more.

so my question would be, (with obvious separate cages) would it be ok and manageable to have one with a furious little plet running the show? My fiancé says no let it be just the one bird since we already have 2 little dogs (10 pounds each).

but every time I go to our local bird store I get baby bird fever and will love to bring one home lol

Also adding pictures of boo and her new ginormous tree lol
 

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You can have a cockatiel with a parrotlet, if separate. But....most of the time, a p'lett will not tolerate another bird in it's life unless the other bird is a mate who is compatible. You have a bird who needs to bond with you and I think another bird will interfere with establishing this human-bird bond. It can take up to a year to get a good bond with your p'lett. It all depends on the bird. I know of a person who has a cockatiel and two parrotlets. It took that person over a year before they could get the birds to play without fighting. All are in separate cages.
Single p'letts do very well with their human family.

You said you have two little dogs. I know you are careful with them when your p'lett is out of the cage. Not too long ago, one of our very experienced forum members lost her p'lett because her doggie had a bad day and instead of the dog tolerating the bird, as usual, it decided to ' chomp '...and there was no more p'lett. It was a horrible way to go. The dog did what was natural . He had a bad day. Worse for the bird. I know you are careful. but your bird is not. Accidents do happen. The odd thing about that dog, the owner thought it was shut up in another room when the bird was out. Please be very careful. Please?

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes I do understand that, it was always a though I had and I’m glad I never just went a on a whim.
Yes we are very careful with our dogs and parrotlet. Always have eyes on them and most of the time between shut doors. Her home is in my office where I’ve been spending most of my time lately due to the pandemic so
It works out
 

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There are always risks putting two aggressive and territorial birds together. Like David said, separate cages are a must. Plus, you have to always supervise them when they are outside their cages together. The problem with that is people tend to get too relaxed and lackadaisical watching their birds after a while. It can take just a few seconds for a bird to get injured or killed in a fight. In your case, it is more likely it will be the parrotlet that is worse off in the end with a cockatiel being larger and having a bigger beak.
 

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Most likely they will have separate existence but you can absolutely make it work. Until recently I had five birds, three parrotlet and I have two bourke parakeet. You find your own little rhythm that works with them, yes we have had scuffles and a couple bitten toes so you do have to be careful but overall if you keep them separate and give them individual time out of the cage they will probably choose to mostly ignore each other. My advice would be one one is out and the other is in the cage put a small cover over the top of the cage to avoid toe bites. I think parrotlets are more aggressive in nature than cockatiels, I don't see the size as much of a factor as the nature. Adding another bird is always more work of course, so just make sure you are up for the long haul!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think parrotlets are more aggressive in nature than cockatiels, I don't see the size as much of a factor as the nature. Adding another bird is always more work of course, so just make sure you are up for the long haul!
Tis my thoughts also, I wouldn't want to rock the boat but having a cute cockatiel would be wonderful. Im still going to wait. and just enjoy my little parrotlet while I have her, she is a one person velcro Birdy to the fullest and I've had issues with getting her to just forage and stay occupied

** she is just a little over a year old and im wondering if she's this young is maybe a friendship would benefit her from a distance, but the noise level concerns me because I live in a apartment building and she is very vocal her self lol
 

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I had a grey cheek, a little bigger than a P'lett way back when. He was extremely territorial with his cage. I was helping my hubs out before we got married to take care of his Mexican Green conure while he was visiting family in KS. Freddy- the conure was about 7 x's bigger than Boris my grey cheek.
I set the cages side by side but not to close. Well I opened the door to Fred's cage and he hopped out and immediately flew to the top of Boris's cage. Boris was PO-ed! He grabbed bars very hard as he clanked his way up the outside of his cage with all feathers flattened and a very determined look in his eyes, like a Pirate going after someone who stole his drink! I was saying," Nooo Boris!" but he ran up to Fred and sunk his beak- looked exactly like a P'let beak, into Fred's toe! Poor Fred squawked and flew back to his cage. Boris stood on top of his cage all proud and screaming at Fred with that very loud how dare you type of squawking noise in between calling him a "Baaad Boy' YOU and NO and laughing.- would make your ears bleed!
I think if Fred were to fight back he would have killed my little Boris- I was very lucky.
Although a P'Let's beak is bigger than a cockatiel the cockatiel has a bigger body, perhaps more force.
 

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Tis my thoughts also, I wouldn't want to rock the boat but having a cute cockatiel would be wonderful. Im still going to wait. and just enjoy my little parrotlet while I have her, she is a one person velcro Birdy to the fullest and I've had issues with getting her to just forage and stay occupied

** she is just a little over a year old and im wondering if she's this young is maybe a friendship would benefit her from a distance, but the noise level concerns me because I live in a apartment building and she is very vocal her self lol
Mmmmm 😬 I can pretty much guarantee your parrotlet is not interested in a friend..... Not even from a distance. And they will probably spur each other on with the chirping. All mine do.
 

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I originally had 2 birds (Bo and Jules) for about 6 months, we then lost Bo and we went with one bird (Jules) for 8 years, about six months ago we picked up baby Rio and went back to a two bird family. We have since lost Jules and are back to one bird (Rio). There is good and bad in both situations, multiple birds do allow the birds to have a bit of kindred spirit companionship, but you also get more territorial fights over cages, perches and people. From a people's point of view you get more feathered friends which is good but they are significantly more messy and it seems while we had two birds we ended up with the mess of 3-5 birds. But the big difference is in the bond. While we have always bonded strongly with all our birds the bond to a single bird is much stronger, much more affectionate and attentive. Birds as a rule are a bit more standoffish than other pets. I think most people prefer the single bird bonding because it brings more of that emotional connection that people crave from their pets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Birds as a rule are a bit more standoffish than other pets. I think most people prefer the single bird bonding because it brings more of that emotional connection that people crave from their pets.
Yes that’s the bond I have with her now. But sometimes I get worried that she will be lonely since now I am going to start working outside the house. For 3 weeks is 40 hours then after that maybe 15-20 hours a week
 

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Yes that’s the bond I have with her now. But sometimes I get worried that she will be lonely since now I am going to start working outside the house. For 3 weeks is 40 hours then after that maybe 15-20 hours a week
As long as you can get an hour with her a day she will be fine.
Understand that in the wild birds mainly sit alone in trees all day long and forage. Flocks are the exception and not the rule. Parrotlets in particular are not a tightly flocked species but mainly flock for comfort, safety, security. As long as you have someplace the bird feels safe during the day they should be fine.
 

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Yes that’s the bond I have with her now. But sometimes I get worried that she will be lonely since now I am going to start working outside the house. For 3 weeks is 40 hours then after that maybe 15-20 hours a week
One suggestion, before the pandemic we would spend a lot of time away from home. I have a "bird cam" (internet camera) on my guys so I could keep and eye on them and see what they were up to while I was gone. It was quite useful in that birds do not see things the same way we do so you can check out their reactions while away. From Jules I learned that keeping the TV on so she would have some noise bothered her so I stopped. Same with the nature forest noises I put on I figure she would find relaxing but just seemed to upset her. She actually preferred the quiet. At the time she had a room for her we called the bird room but was actually my wifes office. The camera let us figure out she was more comfortable with the door closed while we were gone than not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
One suggestion, before the pandemic we would spend a lot of time away from home. I have a "bird cam" (internet camera) on my guys so I could keep and eye on them and see what they were up to while I was gone. It was quite useful in that birds do not see things the same way we do so you can check out their reactions while away. From Jules I learned that keeping the TV on so she would have some noise bothered her so I stopped. Same with the nature forest noises I put on I figure she would find relaxing but just seemed to upset her. She actually preferred the quiet. At the time she had a room for her we called the bird room but was actually my wifes office. The camera let us figure out she was more comfortable with the door closed while we were gone than not.
That’s a great idea. I have one for my dogs so see what they get into when we’re not home
 

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I once got Tumi a Beta fish to watch when I was out, and he enjoyed his "pet." He does NOT want a bird friend, though. If you really worried about boredom, a fish might be a good choice. I literally picked a fish in Tumi's favorite colors and put it in a covered tank near his cage, and he enjoyed watching it. I would recommend that long before I would recommend a bird companions for most parrotlets.
 

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When my Huey passed I was looking to get a cockatiel, I had purchased a baby and spent quite a bit of time visiting him at the bird store. We had created a nice bond.
One thing I did not like at all was the size of the poops! lol. Compared to parrotlet poops they were huge.
He ended up dying before he was ready to go home and then the bird store got the yellow parrotlet and I purchased him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I once got Tumi a Beta fish to watch when I was out, and he enjoyed his "pet."
It’s so funny you mention a fish friend, my fiancé’s has fish tanks in the kitchen and my baby love to watch them! We take 10 min trips to the kitchen to visit the fish tanks 😂
 
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