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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just brought home a baby parrotlet 2 days ago. He is constantly trying to bite me when I try to get him out of his cage and when he's in his cage he is chirping really loudly and I'm not sure why. Can someone tell me?
 

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Welcome to the forum! Your baby parrotlet will bite you! You have to let him settle down for a week or so. Parrotlets do tend to bite all their lives because they are a parrot! Some bite more than others, but when he starts to bond with you, he will settle down a bit. Is he wild? Has he been human hand raised? Does he step up?

He will, most likely, not like it very much if you put your hand in the cage. They all have a problem with a hand coming at them. Some get over it , but it takes a long, long time.

How old is your baby? Where did you get it? From a breeder? Is he on a seed mix or formula?

Do you cover it 11-12 hours a night? Is it a male? Send a pic if you can. Make it a close up pic.

Tell us as much as you can about your baby.

Dave
 

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Birds are wild animals, and do not naturally trust humans. Earning trust is a slow process. You have to slowly teach your bird that you are not harmful. Even then, parrotlets often bite in "self defense" when they are frightened, which they can be of anything bigger than them or at all threatening (aka the whole world). Making noise, however, is what birds do! They are messy and loud, and the happiest birds are messiest and loudest. Silent birds are sick, injured, or stuffed animals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum! Your baby parrotlet will bite you! You have to let him settle down for a week or so. Parrotlets do tend to bite all their lives because they are a parrot! Some bite more than others, but when he starts to bond with you, he will settle down a bit. Is he wild? Has he been human hand raised? Does he step up?

He will, most likely, not like it very much if you put your hand in the cage. They all have a problem with a hand coming at them. Some get over it , but it takes a long, long time.

How old is your baby? Where did you get it? From a breeder? Is he on a seed mix or formula?

Do you cover it 11-12 hours a night? Is it a male? Send a pic if you can. Make it a close up pic.

Tell us as much as you can about your baby.

Dave
He is about 10-11 weeks old. I bought him from a pet store. They told me they would handle him and he was good. He was pretty good the first day I brought him home. But after that he started biting me really hard and does not want to be picked up. I'm trying to teach him how to step up. If I have him out of the cage he will step up on my finger when I tell him too but he more tries to get into my shirt or in my hair to hide. I do not cover him at night. Is that something I should be doing?
 

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He does need 12 hours of quiet dark sleep, and a cover can be helpful for that.

It sounds to me like he wasn't handraised very much, which would affect his relationship with you to start. You have to convince him that you are not a Parrotlet-Eating-Monster. While generalizations aren't the best and I am making it based on a couple sentences, oftentimes pet stores are not ideal locations to find a handraised parrot from, as they focus more on the dog/cat community and frequently their employees are not bird owners. It is possible that the employees did not know how to properly handle a bird, or did not handle him with enough frequency. Additionally, I assume that he wasn't weaned at the pet store, so his life before then would effect how easily he takes to human hands.

Look in to Gentle Beak - many parrotlets respond well to it. Especially while you are creating the initial bond, try to keep him where you are in control like on your knee or your arm instead of your shoulder or hair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He does need 12 hours of quiet dark sleep, and a cover can be helpful for that.

It sounds to me like he wasn't handraised very much, which would affect his relationship with you to start. You have to convince him that you are not a Parrotlet-Eating-Monster. While generalizations aren't the best and I am making it based on a couple sentences, oftentimes pet stores are not ideal locations to find a handraised parrot from, as they focus more on the dog/cat community and frequently their employees are not bird owners. It is possible that the employees did not know how to properly handle a bird, or did not handle him with enough frequency. Additionally, I assume that he wasn't weaned at the pet store, so his life before then would effect how easily he takes to human hands.

Look in to Gentle Beak - many parrotlets respond well to it. Especially while you are creating the initial bond, try to keep him where you are in control like on your knee or your arm instead of your shoulder or hair.
I'm assuming he wasn't handled much. He is currently hiding in his little house and when I talk to him he sticks his head out at me with his beak wide open like he's going to bite me. Ill definitely start covering him at night.
Mesh Terrestrial plant Creative arts Wood Pattern
 

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That little house also could be a part of the problem. I know that he loves it, but it can be dangerous if he chews on it and it will make him more hormonal and aggressive. Instead, consider a strip of fleece tied to the side of the cage as a snuggle. In a closed item like that, he will defend it like a nest.
 

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This is a fantastic place to turn to for advice, and you're obviously a caring parrotlet owner because you're seeking to inform yourself and doing what you can to improve your relationship, and accepting your little guy where he is right now (bites and all)!

If you're having trouble with aggression and defensiveness, I second the advice to gently remove the little snuggle hut/cave. I've had the best luck with removing items that my bird was defending if I did so in the morning, right after he'd gotten his best possible sleep. He also seems very happy to see me in the morning because I am the bringer of food.

If stepping up doesn't seem like what your little one is ready for, consider starting with target training. You can do this easily with nothing but a wooden chopstick (maybe you've even got some left over in a drawer from a takeout meal). You don't need a clicker, either, to be honest I just make a clicking noise with my tongue in my cheek because my bird was afraid of the clicker I got which he deemed WAY TOO LOUD AND SCARY. Does your bird like any treats? Mine loves millet. The great thing about target training is that it can be done through the cage so you're less likely to get chomped.

Here's a link to great video about it: Training Tutorial | Target Training (by Flock Talks)

I also recommend Flock Talks videos in general, they have been extremely helpful to me as a first-time parrotlet owner for the last year and a bit.

Good luck with your little one! Let us know how it goes!
 

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I just brought home a baby parrotlet 2 days ago. He is constantly trying to bite me when I try to get him out of his cage and when he's in his cage he is chirping really loudly and I'm not sure why. Can someone tell me?
First off, please only get parrots from shelters, if at all. If I had my way, they'd be illegal to own at all due to usual endings.

They can be wonderful companions but usually things end up tragically as they live so very long and our lives eventually revolve around other people or jobs or whatever and this poor creature is left alone to die of sadness.

Having said all that, he/she is just scared of you. Keep it in a nice large cage and leave it be for awhile. Make sure he/she has clean water and pellets. Leave a treat once in awhile like dried fruit or millet. Don't make sudden movements or loud noises. They HATE new environments, situations, people, and pets....but each one also has it's own very unique personality. They are NOT hamsters with wings. They are at least as smart as a dog and see and think about their surroundings all the time. Once they feel comfortable, they need a lot of attention, stimulation, and play. It's a lot of responsibility if you want it to be happy. Eventually, if you show it love and it gets used to you leaving food and water in it's cage/home. It will understand you respect its territory and eventually will want some stimulation and fun. If you are gentle and consistent not only will it trust you, it will develop a strong bond, but it takes time.

Try hard to imagine if King Kong took you home and put you in a cage on Skull Island. Seems silly to compare? It's not.
But if Skull Island is all you have, you learn quickly who your friends are and if you can trust them.

Much love.
Greeniebird, Poopah, Ghostie, and Blue
Bird Vertebrate Beak Parrot Gesture
 

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This is a fantastic place to turn to for advice, and you're obviously a caring parrotlet owner because you're seeking to inform yourself and doing what you can to improve your relationship, and accepting your little guy where he is right now (bites and all)!

If you're having trouble with aggression and defensiveness, I second the advice to gently remove the little snuggle hut/cave. I've had the best luck with removing items that my bird was defending if I did so in the morning, right after he'd gotten his best possible sleep. He also seems very happy to see me in the morning because I am the bringer of food.

If stepping up doesn't seem like what your little one is ready for, consider starting with target training. You can do this easily with nothing but a wooden chopstick (maybe you've even got some left over in a drawer from a takeout meal). You don't need a clicker, either, to be honest I just make a clicking noise with my tongue in my cheek because my bird was afraid of the clicker I got which he deemed WAY TOO LOUD AND SCARY. Does your bird like any treats? Mine loves millet. The great thing about target training is that it can be done through the cage so you're less likely to get chomped.

Here's a link to great video about it: Training Tutorial | Target Training (by Flock Talks)

I also recommend Flock Talks videos in general, they have been extremely helpful to me as a first-time parrotlet owner for the last year and a bit.

Good luck with your little one! Let us know how it goes!
Good advice. Take it slow! Be gentle and caring and patient!
 
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