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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to Europe this summer and will have to leave my Parrotlet for the first time. She is about six months old and I've never been away from her for more than a weekend. She's very social and is an "only child". I work from home so she is always sitting with me.

I am worried about her mental health boarding her with her breeder for so long? Is there anything I can do to help her transition? Maybe have her there a few weekend before I leave?

I just want to make the time away as easy for her as possible.

Also, has anyone had experience leaving a bird for a few weeks and coming back and them acting differently? I am afraid she will be mad at me for leaving or at least be confused why I left,
 

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I just got back from Europe and was there for 4 weeks. My parrotlet girl is 1.5 years old. She is an single bird and it is only her and I at home. I also spend all my time with her as I work from home. About a week before my vacation I started to cage her in the afternoon for 2 hours, leaving her alone in the living room. When I dropped her off for boarding she went with her favorite toy. I asked to move her carrier so that she could not see me leaving. Silly? It broke my heart to leave her there all alone. However, there are other birds and lots to see. When I picked her up she made lots of short high chirps, definately excited to see me. At home she went straight on my shoulder, then inspected her kitchen drawer, checked all the landing spots in my home, asked for scritches and took a nap on my shoulder. There was not one pin feather on her head ... In my case boarding went very well. I will keep my fingers crossed for you!
Still, because I felt so bad about leaving her there alone, I might consider getting a second parrotlet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! Believe me I have considered getting a second because they are such social animals, but I decided against it because I wanted her to bond with me and because I work from home and could give her the attention she needed.

Is it typical to let them interact with other birds in boarding?
 

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Agreed. Our bond is the tricky part and my only concern with a second bird. I love that she hangs out with me all the time, following wherever I go. It is just so sweet.
At my boarding place they will evaluate who can be out with whom in common play areas and with supervision.
 

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Hi there. I have left my girl at a bird sitter for many years now and like you, I was worried sick about her. She was young when I started doing it and she is quite an old lady now. She is an only parrotlet and we are strongly bonded. I thought she would miss me and go into s depression wondering where I was. I think perhaps I over-humanized my little wild bird.

Being in her usual cage with all of her things meant her territory went with her. The bird sitter had a detailed list of her eating, sleeping, activity routine and being experienced with birds, she was able to follow it well. She even added things that Kiwi would not have had with me, like feeding her warm oatmeal from s spoon in the afternoon. Which she loved. She was kept in a part of the house with other smaller birds (this lady also bird sits large parrots but they’re in a separate part of the house) and she picked up a number of interesting sounds when I would bring her home. They would eventually fade, but it was fun to hear them. She was always bright and chirpy, happy to see me and animated in a way that I figured she was telling me about HER vacation. I have since referred to the bird sitter as the birdie spa! I never saw any sign of distress, depression, anxiety and no change in behaviour other than positive ones (like the new sounds). I, on the other hand, had symptoms of all of the above until she was back in my care!

So I think you should not worry about this for your bird. I am sure you will leave a detailed list of how to care for the little fluff ball and contact numbers in case of emergency. I would check in with my bird sitter from time to time but it was always positive, happy news about her antics so over time, I did that a little less than when I started.

The reality is that you have to find a way to both live your lives and you will need to be apart sometimes. You will need to overcome angst about this type of thing if you want to have a healthy, balanced life with your bird. It is clear you adore her and take great pains to care for her very well, it is ok for you to go and enjoy your remarkable vacation. Do everything you can to ensure her comfort and care, then go and have fun. It will do nothing more than improve your relationship.
 
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