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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I searched for posts about heating lamps and bulbs, but they were kind of old. Maybe some of you guys have more experience with heating than before!

So i'm just generally wondering what is used for heating elements for your babies. Last year I didn't get a bulb, Fletch's cage is away from windows and near warmth. But now that we have Flint, she may need something other than just a blanket over her cage. She's right by a window - and the blanket protects her from the drafts. However, this morning she looked so cold, and when I took her out her little feetsies were cold :c .

I've thought about simple heated perches as well. I don't want to make any purchases without any input. The reviews on Amazon are useless in my opinion. Lol! (Pet stores around here only have reptile heating bulbs, and I do not trust them to be safe with my birds. Hence why I am searching via Amazon!)
 

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how cold do you expect her area to get?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The thermostat read just under 70 degrees when she looked a little chilly. However, it's not by her cage. It was probably more around 60-ish degrees near her.
 

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I have a small oil filled space heater for Amora, since my bedroom is an attic room it can get pretty chilly in the early hours of the morning. I put it on when I wake up at 6am, turn it off half an hour later by which time it has heated the whole room for the day. Alternatively you could turn it on before bed, to keep them warm through the night. It was only about £35 and they're really easy to find, especially this time of year!!
 

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My guys have done fine with something to snuggle in at night and when it gets super cold I use an oiled filled radiator as supplemental heat.
 

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I just use the main heating system in my home, but when it gets super cold in the winter I use portable radiator heaters for the birds and my bed room...I live in a vintage house so parts of the house can get colder.
 

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I've heard good things about the heated panels like these - http://www.windycityparrot.com/bird...l-for-warming-small-birds-p-136.html?sort=20a
I don't have one, but that is my wishlist for warming up Tumi. I like that they aren't on it, just near it, so they don't get burned no matter what.
It's so funny you brought this up, because I never saw it before, and then I saw it again TWICE :p so in some conversation I heard two accounts that one bird did get burned (not sure how?) And that another was injured in some way I'm not exactly clear, something to do with the cord maybe? Anyway, worth looking into more. Anyone else here personally have one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a small oil filled space heater for Amora, since my bedroom is an attic room it can get pretty chilly in the early hours of the morning. I put it on when I wake up at 6am, turn it off half an hour later by which time it has heated the whole room for the day. Alternatively you could turn it on before bed, to keep them warm through the night. It was only about £35 and they're really easy to find, especially this time of year!!
Well, I don't have a space heater, but I have a humidifier. Maybe that would help some
 

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Avi tech heat panel. Bodie loved his.
 

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Hello!
I have a mineral oil radiator type heater, like Rhianna has. I put it about 5 feet away from my Bogie and put it on Lo to Medium. I do not know where you live, but p'letts are naturally tropical, so they do need heat. Cold stresses their metabolism and causes ailments.

In America, we have places you can get the oil heater. They look like a radiator and the oil is heated inside the unit. Two stores have this type of unit. Lowes and Home Depot. Lowes usually carries them more than Home Depot. I guess you live in America.

Using the oil heater is a wise move because it heats up the whole area, not only for your birdie, but for the house/apartment/condo, etc. Bogie loves his! When I get him out of his cage in the morning, his feetsies have the warmsies and his kisses are wonderful.

There are two sizes to choose from. I bought the larger one for $38.00 a few years ago. Bogie is in a large room. If your room is small--about an average sized bedroom--then get the smaller one. The power bill did not change at all. The units are absolutely quiet! No smells either and are environmentally safe to use because the oil is self contained. You never have to replace the oil, but you can if you need to for some reason.

I hoped this helped.
 

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this is a WARNING....

On the topic of heating, I want to point out that if your using any kind of heater around your bird, be sure you do a diligent research on if it is safe. Be aware that KEROSENE heaters are NOT SAFE. I would never even think of a kerosene heater, but they are out there and I know of someone who just lost two birds, a Cockatoo and a Love bird simultaneously because of a kerosene heater.

Also beware of any heaters that may contain a surface with PTFE PFOA, that can release a toxic deadly gas (same as teflon)

As for the little heating panel, be careful how you mount it and keep a close monitor on it. I read of one bird who was badly burned (not sure how) and another who chewed on the cord and was injured (probable a user error).
I don't have one but am still interested in trying it someday.
 

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I read that they are comfortable in temps as low as 50 F. Also, how do you really tell that it's cold? Obviously you can if it's very cold for a prolonged periods but otherwise...? Are cold feet an indicator? I noticed that feet temperature varies a lot with no apparent relation to room temp.
 

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You feet aren't a good judge, because that has to do more with circulation than temperature. Pay attention to your arms and your core. If you are chilled without a bunch of sweaters and jackets, then it is cold. Also, get a thermometer. That way you will know.
 

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We keep Jules room at 65 in winter and she seems to be fine.

My understanding that the big issue with temps for birds are sudden temperature changes and breezes / winds. These things make it harder for the bird to lock and fluff their feathers (their version of a down jacket)

The big thing about temperatures is what is your bird used to. If she is used to being kept in a room that ranges between 65-75 degrees she will be fine. If all of a sudden the room goes to 35 that can be and issue but is she was acclimatized to it 35 degrees over time then she would be ok. They are sort of like us humans in that way.
 

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You feet aren't a good judge, because that has to do more with circulation than temperature. Pay attention to your arms and your core. If you are chilled without a bunch of sweaters and jackets, then it is cold. Also, get a thermometer. That way you will know.
Quite right. I was talking about parrot feet though
 

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Parrots can warm their feet up, and their body temperature is warmer than ours, so I don't know that you could use feet as a judge for whether or not the bird is cold. Toasty toes is more a sign that the bird was napping and tucked the feet under the feathers, and not really a judge of the overall situation.
 
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