Parrotlets Forum : TalkParrotlets banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are moving to Qatar in July for an indefinite number of years and obviously want to take the ball of feathers with us. First, let me say how miserable I am at the thought of making him go through this, but we are flock and migrate together.

I am hiring a pet relocating company to deal with all the paperwork. No quarantine is necessary. But it appears that the only option internationally is for the bird to travel as cargo. Is this true?

Fortunately, all flights to Doha arrive there at night when it is not blazing hot. As far as he is concerned, it will be nighttime (in cargo) for the entire flight. I need valium for myself at the mere thought of having to do a connecting flight, and someone opening his cage.

By July he will only be 10 months. He travels a lot already, we go places on weekends, we take the bus and subway, and he is used to sleeping in strange rooms, something we have been doing in preparation for a longer move.

It is a long flight, so I want the best travel cage, the best stuff in the cage, the best airline, and any other advice of anyone who has ever done it, or can put me in contact with someone who has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
Sorry

I barely get out of Iowa. Don't have any advice but Im glad you won't be separted from you ball of feathers.:)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
146 Posts
It sound like you have him well prepared for traveling. I have friends that travel back and forth with small dogs and they allow them to be placed under the seat on the jet. The go to and from Mexico. You might try and see if you can place him under your seat. You are lucky he will not have to be quarantined. I have concerns as well because we will be moving to Australia in the future as we have a home on 5 acres in Hervey Bay Queensland, they do have quarantine and I think it is 30 days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
I have a lot of experience with shipping, as well as importing, and I have a question for you. You say you will be going to Qatar for an indefinite number of years. Does that mean you will be going and not returning or will you be coming back to the US at sometime in the future? This may be putting the cart before the horse but once you take your bird out of the US, it might not be so easy to get him back in. The US does have quarantine and it's very expensive. Just at the end of last year, 2 bird owners attempted to bring birds back into the US and neither had the proper paperwork. One of the birds was euthanized by US Fish & Wildlife because its owner could not afford the fees. The other bird came home successfully but fees totalled close to $4,500.00.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Callie, I will look into this in more detail asap, as I am in the very early stages of planning. I had understood that there is no quarantine for birds that originated in the US, or rather that the quarantine is "at home" or something like that, does this sound accurate? We don´t know when/if we will be moving back at this stage, so can only operate with the information we have right now. Fortunately, by working with the pet relocation company I am relying on their years of experience in dealing with expats coming back and forth: http://www.qatarpetrelocators.com/index2.php

Will keep posting updates as and when I move forward with this, so that I can contribute some information to the topic, not just difficult questions :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
I'm not sure about the specifics of taking a bird out of the US, but there is such a thing as home quarantine. Canada has it, as do other countries. The US is one of the strictest about allowing birds (including pet birds) enter our borders. I know your concern is going right now but I would hate to see you take him out of the country and not be able to get him back in! The big issues are Exotic Newcastle Disease and Avian Influenza.

Here are a few links that I think will be helpful:
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_exp...pet_bird.shtml

Permits - Import/Export
http://www.fws.gov/permits/ImportExp...ortExport.html


http://www.birdchannel.com/bird-news...s-and-law.aspx

From an article by Rebecca Sweat:
International travel with an exotic pet bird is more of a challenge. It requires taking many steps to ensure that all is done on the “export” side (the country you are leaving) and equal amounts of preparations on the “import” side—where you are taking the exotic animal.

If you are planning on leaving the U. S. with your parrot, you will need to get a CITES permit before you go. CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) is an international agreement between nations, prohibiting the import of certain species of wild animals and plants, in an effort to protect these species in their natural habitats. All members of the Order Psittaciformes, with the exception of the budgerigar and the cockatiel, are listed in this agreement. Pet psittacines can still be transported from one country to another with a CITES permit. In the U. S., these are issued by the Office of Management Authority of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

“It does take some time though to get the CITES permit, so you should start working on getting your permit about a year before your trip,” Rowe said. You can get an application for a permit online at www.international.fws.gov (click on “permits”). The permit will need to be validated by a USFWS wildlife inspector before you leave the U.S. You will need to take a copy of your validated permit with you on your trip, and present it when you re-enter the U.S. with your pet.

You will also need to contact the country(ies) you plan to visit and find out what their requirements are for entry with an exotic pet bird. “A lot of times they’re consistent with CITES, but not always,” Rowe said. “You have to abide by CITES, but there may also be individual specific local requirements of the country you’re visiting.”
I just looked at the Qatar Pet Relocators site and it looks like they know a lot about cats and dogs. I didn't see any mention about birds so be very careful! Refer to the links I've left to make sure that everything is being done correctly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
It sound like you have him well prepared for traveling. I have friends that travel back and forth with small dogs and they allow them to be placed under the seat on the jet. The go to and from Mexico. You might try and see if you can place him under your seat. You are lucky he will not have to be quarantined. I have concerns as well because we will be moving to Australia in the future as we have a home on 5 acres in Hervey Bay Queensland, they do have quarantine and I think it is 30 days.

I was given a fantastic green cheek conure from a person that moved to Australia. She had her green cheek with her ex while she looked for a new home for her bird. I got my green cheek from her ex in October 2010. She really tried to take him and called about a quarantine or anything that would allow her to take him to Australia. She said that Australia wouldn't allow it even with a quarantine. She really loves this bird and is still in contact with me at least once a month. I don't think she was lying to me since she gave her awesome green cheek for free.. I was just mentioning this incase the laws have changed or if there are different laws for different birds or areas in Australia. I hope you are able to take your parrotlets and any other pets if you ever move back.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
146 Posts
I was given a fantastic green cheek conure from a person that moved to Australia. She had her green cheek with her ex while she looked for a new home for her bird. I got my green cheek from her ex in October 2010. She really tried to take him and called about a quarantine or anything that would allow her to take him to Australia. She said that Australia wouldn't allow it even with a quarantine. She really loves this bird and is still in contact with me at least once a month. I don't think she was lying to me since she gave her awesome green cheek for free.. I was just mentioning this incase the laws have changed or if there are different laws for different birds or areas in Australia. I hope you are able to take your parrotlets and any other pets if you ever move back.

Was was more worried about the quarantine period, but I think things have changed. I do not have any other pets but we have a beautiful 30 foot fishing boat and I have gotten estimates for shipping it over there.........$30,000.00. I am sure Australia would make it impossible to bring my birds over. It will be 4 to 5 years before we can move.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update:
- I contacted U.S. Fish and Wildlife services to start the CITES application. They were fantastic and not at all like calling the DMV. I left a message with my questions and got a call back just a few hours later. The CITES permit will take approximately 60 days, and once issued is valid for 6 months.
- I had to contact my breeder to get a formal-looking certificate of origin, and she was very concerned with the ability of the bird to re-enter the U.S. in the future. I did some more research on this, and there is an important distinction according to where the bird was born. USDA says:

"Returning U.S. origin pet birds from these countries (there is a sizable list) must go into 30-day quarantine in an USDA animal import quarantine facility. OTHERWISE; THE BIRD IS QUARANTINED FOR 30 DAYS AT THE OWNER´S RESIDENCE (HOME QUARANTINE). Pet birds returning from Canada are exempt from quarantine".

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/return_pet_bird.shtml
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
My big concern, too, is re-entering the US and having the proper paperwork is the most important step you can take! I've seen our system in action and it's not user friendly if you lack proper paperwork!!!

As for USDA quarantine stations, I know there's one in San Ysidro, CA, one in NY and another one in Miami. There might be a couple more that I don't know about but those 3 are the major ones. I've had birds in San Ysidro and they are pretty good with the birds, although one of mine died while at that facility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My only concern right now is to get the little one over to the Persian Gulf in good health in the middle of their insane summer weather.

Will keep posting updates here in the event that someone else ever needs to know the steps and obstacles of exporting Parrotlets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
I can understand your priority right now but if not done correctly, you could get him there and not be able to bring him back when/if you return to the US. That CITIES permit will keep a lot of doors open for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I absolutely get your point, but I don´t understand what you mean by "not done correctly", unless we have specifics regarding the terrifying case that you mentioned, would it be possible to get details like these?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This helps. What we can gather from this experience is: don´t mess with CITES, make sure you check with USDA about the correct port-of-entry into the US, have all documentation associated with the bird with you (previous CITES, vets and chain of ownership), and be prepared to pay any unexpected fees, which from the earlier story you shared, we know can be up in the $4000s per bird.

It is clear that getting the bird back into the US may be a lot harder than getting him out. I am not sure why anyone would try to wing it (pun intended) and leave without a CITES! In my case, Qatar will not accept a bird without a CITES, and I wonder if the airline would not check as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
It is clear that getting the bird back into the US may be a lot harder than getting him out.
My point, exactly! Ollie's story is every bird owner's nightmare and there's a lot more of this going on than most are aware of. Knowledge is power so gather as much as you can. Taking him to Qatar is the easy part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,388 Posts
An alternate plan to get him back here, should you run into difficulty, might be to send him back through Canada. I know of a very good importer/exporter in Toronto who could help you if you need it. I can PM that information to you privately should you want it, just in case.

If there is any doubt in your mind at all about your success of getting him back here, it would be much better to have someone you trust take care of him while you are gone. I know you want him with you but there's a lot that can go wrong so alternate plans might be worth considering. As the girl on my board said. Had she left her bird behind when she moved to Puerto Rico, at least he would still be alive.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks Callie, I will get in touch if and when that happens to consider options, going through another country is a brilliant idea. Also, we need to consider that USDA advisories might change, and although Qatar is not on a "red list" at the moment, I cannot discard that possibility one day, so will have to make decisions based on the most current information at the time (and with hours on the phone to USDA). Rest assured, if there was any uncertainty about his ability to be re-imported, we would simply consider not coming back and moving elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thank you! The article the author wrote "Taking Pet Birds to Mexico" is amazing, moving away from horror stories to actual detailed experiences. Although very specific to Mexican authorities, it really helps. I think this sums up how I am embarking the task:
" It also requires the idea that even though all the paperwork — plus some — has been properly completed, there will probably be something missing — just because. The key is to remain extremely flexible, cooperative and smile in the face of adversity."
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top