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Hi all,

I am at a loss of what to do. One of my parrotlets had en accident a couple of years ago which left him blind on one side. Since then he has been having seizures once in a while (not a lot, once every couple of months or so). A couple of weeks ago it started to happen more frequently, because we had to give him antibiotics. Stress/frights seem to be a trigger. When we stopped the medicine he still had them quite frequently. Vet did some bloodwork to check his organ status and all was fine. He has to take phenobarbital twice a day now, so again we have the problem of having to medicate him. The first two days it worked giving the medicine on tiny pieces of cashew. But today he didn't like it anymore (as if he suddenly tasted the medicine). So we had to catch him again.. That was easily done (didn't have to chase him) , but he stressed out so much that he had a seizure afterwards. I am training him to take fluids from a syringe in the meantime but it goes slowly. I don't know how to give him the medicine until I have trained him to take it voluntarily. I want to make sure he gets the full dose, but I do want to prevent him from having seizures.. If you have any creative ideas, please let me know..
 

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Hi all,

I am at a loss of what to do. One of my parrotlets had en accident a couple of years ago which left him blind on one side. Since then he has been having seizures once in a while (not a lot, once every couple of months or so). A couple of weeks ago it started to happen more frequently, because we had to give him antibiotics. Stress/frights seem to be a trigger. When we stopped the medicine he still had them quite frequently. Vet did some bloodwork to check his organ status and all was fine. He has to take phenobarbital twice a day now, so again we have the problem of having to medicate him. The first two days it worked giving the medicine on tiny pieces of cashew. But today he didn't like it anymore (as if he suddenly tasted the medicine). So we had to catch him again.. That was easily done (didn't have to chase him) , but he stressed out so much that he had a seizure afterwards. I am training him to take fluids from a syringe in the meantime but it goes slowly. I don't know how to give him the medicine until I have trained him to take it voluntarily. I want to make sure he gets the full dose, but I do want to prevent him from having seizures.. If you have any creative ideas, please let me know..
Look up:
“How to give your bird liquid medicine via syringe” (YouTube video) it’s a really good instructional video!
I don’t know how to copy and paste something in this forum so you’ll have to look it up. Good luck to you! Hope it helps you out.
 

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This is one of the times you have to take hold of your birdie against his/her will. Using a syringe with the proper dose, you must position your bird with his back to the palm of your hand. Make sure you have his head between your thumb and middle finger. Use those fingers to hold his head still as best as you can. he will try to bite whatever he can!

Once positioned, take the syringe and put it against the bottom part of his beak and to the side of his beak a little bit. Push the syringe against and upward to try and force his beak open. ( DO NOT APPLY MEDS AT THIS TIME) Keep trying until he opens the beak. YOU HAVE TO BE QUICK-- As soon as he opens his beak, squirt the medicine in him. All the medicine has to do is touch his tongue. When he opens his beak, he Will push back with his tongue. It may take a few times, but this is one of the times you must be persistent!

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Look up:
“How to give your bird liquid medicine via syringe” (YouTube video) it’s a really good instructional video!
I don’t know how to copy and paste something in this forum so you’ll have to look it up. Good luck to you! Hope it helps you out.
Hi Kathy, thanks for your reply. I have been trying to train this in the meantime. He did this really well about 4 years ago but I didn't continue with the training and now I regret not having done that. So I know he can do it but at this point the syringe is really scary again. So it takes a while to get him that far again. I was hoping to get some creative ideas (with food or whatnot) in the meantime so I can still get some medicine inside him until he learns to take it from the syringe voluntarily...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is one of the times you have to take hold of your birdie against his/her will. Using a syringe with the proper dose, you must position your bird with his back to the palm of your hand. Make sure you have his head between your thumb and middle finger. Use those fingers to hold his head still as best as you can. he will try to bite whatever he can!

Once positioned, take the syringe and put it against the bottom part of his beak and to the side of his beak a little bit. Push the syringe against and upward to try and force his beak open. ( DO NOT APPLY MEDS AT THIS TIME) Keep trying until he opens the beak. YOU HAVE TO BE QUICK-- As soon as he opens his beak, squirt the medicine in him. All the medicine has to do is touch his tongue. When he opens his beak, he Will push back with his tongue. It may take a few times, but this is one of the times you must be persistent!

Dave
Hi Dave, thanks for your reply. We do this with our other parrotlet who has some liver issues and with him it's done in 10 seconds. Tzoco, however, gets so scared that he gets a seizure at least 50 percent of the time... The medicine is supposed to prevent him from having seizures but stress/frights are a trigger for him. So if we catch him he only gets more seizures instead of less so in that case giving medicine defeats the purpose.. The vet's assistant agreed on that. I am trying to train him to voluntarily take fluids (and eventually the medicine) from a syringe. In the meantime I have to find creative ways to get some medicine in him to prevent seizures in the meantime. Maybe someone has success with one thing or another. I have tried putting it on pieces of cashew. Which worked for 2 days. Then suddenly he didn't like it anymore (as if he suddenly tasted the medicine on it or the texture wasn't pleasant). I have tried it on a slice of kiwi, which kind of works but I don't want to give him kiwi twice a day. Next try is bird bread which my husband just bought.. If you have had any successes in the past without restraining the bird I would love to hear about it!
 

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I had a p'lett named Bogie who hated for me to give him his medicines by syringe. But, as I found out, he resisted the first 2-3 times, then he settled down a bit and he mostly accepted it because it was routine. I still had to put him in my hand to give him meds. Since your p'lett suffers a lot when you try to give him meds, I can understand your plight. The key to sneaking him the meds is to not put the meds in the same treat two times in a row. Keep him guessing! P'lets are smart and we have to be smarter, somehow! Put a floret of broccoli between the cage bars next to a perch he sits on. Apply the meds on a very small section of the floret. ( use a small piece of floret ) . If he doesn't like broccoli or he is not used to having fresh broccoli, then you still must try to get him interested in eating some. In all the years I have raised birds, I found very few birds who didn't like broccoli.

I feel for you! You want to help him so much and it probably hurts not to get him on a routine to take his meds. Just keep trying! Someone will come along with an answer for you.

Give your birdies a kiss from me and Vicki, my wife.

David and Vicki
 

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You could try giving the medication in a very small piece of bird bread. It will absorb the medication and none of my parrotlets ever get tired of bird bread even with meds in there. I would recommend having him eat the medication-soaked bird bread in your hand and making sure he eats it all. Gather up any remaining crumbs and hand feed them. Training him to take meds from a syringe would be ideal, but I understand that it's difficult.
 
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