Parrotlets Forum : TalkParrotlets banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all -- I recall my vet telling me some time ago how a bird's body should feel when you handle the bird, but now I cannot recall exactly what he said! Is the breastbone supposed to be more concave or more pronounced than the breast tissue on the sides? I've noticed a couple of times in the last few days that my green rump's abdomen looks a little top heavy. At the moment she looks symmetrical, and she's eating fine and not displaying any other signs of illness.

Oh, here's another question -- How often does your p'let sneeze??? Mine sneezes several times a day. Is that normal?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
Can you weigh her on a gram scale?
Top heavy to me sounds like you are looking at her while she has a full crop, which is up top

Is she molting?
This can cause extra sneezing. Make sure you have her bathe regularly and have access to unfiltered natural lighting or supplemental full spectrum lighting.

This may sound weird, but what type of housing do you live in?
Recently a client of ours dealt with this - an air purifier and humidifier for their apartment (that had poor air) did the trick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,429 Posts
A good indicator of a healthy bird can be found by looking at its breast bone. It should be reasonably plump with no hollows on either side. It shouldn’t appear fat, neither should it be so prominent that you can feel it or see it protruding.
The above is a quote I'd seen on Choosing a Healthy bird:

I've read that some sneezing is normal in some birds - could be dander from the bird itself or from their cage or their environment (usually if the heat in the house is on and the Air is dry)

As long as you are not seeing any nasal discharge or hearing any wheezing noises - a dry sneeze from time to time is alright.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
I don't want to make light of the sneezing, but I heard my bird sneezing quite a lot before she was a year old. There was no discharge, and I was at a loss as to the cause of her potential illness. I began watching her very carefully, and it turned out that she was imitating a kiss sound, not sneezing at all!

You are right search any cause for sneezing. Inhaled toxins or molds, for example, can have serious consequences for both birds and people!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the info! I think you are correct about seeing her with a full crop. She doesn't always look top heavy, and she feels just like the description left by Pado.

As for sneezing, there is no discharge. Birdy bathes daily in her water dish, but hasn't warmed up to the idea of any other bathing recepticle. I clean her cage frequently and wipe down a lot of the dander, but perhaps I will try to be more thorough about it and see if it makes a difference.

She has finished most of her recent molt, but I have noticed a lot of pinfeathers on her wings in the last few days, so I guess she's not quite through.

As for the type of housing, this home is 11 years old and has a swamp cooler in the summer and a heater (without humidifier) in the winter. Birdy is in a north-facing room so she does not get direct sunlight, but it is still pretty bright. And, of course, she travels around the house a lot with various family members.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
Swamp coolers are notorious mold collectors. Any dust that gets into it is food for molds, which thrive on the constant moisture. The blower moves the mold into the indoor air. I was unaware of this when I lived out west, thinking that molds couldn't possibly be the problem because the humidity outside was always so low.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Molds (particularly mildew - that black scum that appears in bathrooms and on plastic shower curtains) can be a constant source of allergic problems in humans and birds alike. Birds are highly susceptible to illness caused by molds. Keep areas they frequent clean (used vinegar instead of harsh chemicals) and well ventilated (but not drafty). Fungus of all kinds (including mold & mushrooms) can be deadly for our feathered companions. And even though humidity is great for birds, you have to keep surfaces clean and dry to ensure the continued health of your little sweetheart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
All parrots should have a 'plump' breast. The keel bone should not be prominent, nor should it be completely 'buried' in the breast. The breast should be well filled out (nicely rounded), not a "V", which would indicate an underweight bird, and/or a bird that gets very little exercise.

As much as we need to keep their wings trimmed sufficiently to keep them from easily gaining altitude, we must also leave them enough feather in order to fly in a controlled manner. This is the exercise they really need. It keeps their breast muscles toned and helps to develop them into the 'plump' breast they should have.

You can never use appearances to judge whether your P'let is a healthy weight. Only a good scale and physical exam will tell you. So, if you haven't done a physical exam on your bird yet, then make an appointment with your vet for a checkup and ask the vet to show you how to examine your little one and verify what a healthy weight is for him/her. Then buy a digital postal scale (that measures in grams) and keep regular tabs on his/her weight (once a week, before breakfast for a healthy, normal bird; daily weighings for birds that are underweight). Keep a log of the weighings, and take it with you to the next vet visit. Vet's love it when you are proactive with your bird's well-being. :)
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top