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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to teach Oliver to take a bath, but all attempts have been unsuccessful. I have a fountain (similar to a birdbath) I try to get him acquainted with, but he doesn't want any part of it. Soooo, someone please tell me how to get Oliver and water acquainted.

Thanks

Paula:(
 

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I hear some like running tap water - some like to be sprayed - some like a shallow dish and some even like wet produce leaves -

I don't have a ton of success yet with getting Mr. Peepers to bathe frequently. Although, he's getting there - His estimated age is about 8 months and he just in the last month or so has shown any interest.

I run the water onto my hand from the faucet and he will run up and down my arm to my hand and through the water but only twice has he done this and never for too long.

Best to offer bath time in the morning to early afternoon as if they bathe in the evening they can get chilled.

I've been told its best not to force or rush them - they seem to do it in their own time.

I have no idea if age has anything to do with it but My Senegal didn't start bathing until she was almost a year also and then loved it - she was a 'come in the shower' bird but preferred the cooler water, so I would have to stand out of her way when it was her turn (I tend to like the water warmer: -)
My Parrotlet I won't bring in the shower, he's too small IMO.

Mr. Peepers is very interested in the faucet running and always flies over when it is turned on - the first time he actually fluffed up as if he was going to bathe - was when I had dripped drops of water from my hand onto his head (but if you do this be sure Oliver doesn't mind your hand above his head - some don't like it) but as soon as I did this he fluffed up and started running under the water, tail fanned and wings drooping apart. But as I said he has only done it once since.

Hopefully some others can give you more experienced opinions -

But I just keep trying - you just never know when their little brains will just click on and decide - now's the time to bathe. ;)

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Pado,

I am going to try the drops of water from the faucet on his head. He absolutely loves me to "nuzzle", rub, kiss the top of his head. A lot of times when I am rubbing his head with my chin, he will lightly tap me with his beak - which means he wants to kiss me on my mouth. Maybe, since he loves having his head rubbed, he will take to the bathing process. I hope so. Another thing he does when I am rubbing his head is to lean his over (kind of like a baby) and go sound asleep. I have only had him a month (he's 6 mo. old) but he seems to learn things very quickly.

Thank you again. I'll keep you posted on our progress.

Paula
 

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Paulie is not a frequent bather. He lets us know when he wants to take a bath. He starts trying to get into his water dish, but even he is to big for it! So I get out the plant mister and he LOVES it. It just crams himself as close to the side of the cage as he can get and I soak him. He will not get into a birdbath...I bought one and he was scared of it.
I really think most birds let you know when they need a bath.
 

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there are several ways that birds bathe in the wild, and we can imitate them all:

1. bathing in a pool of water- this can be done with a plain basin. adding a shiny mirror to the bottom sometimes entices reluctant bathers.

2. bathing in a waterfall- this can be duplicated two ways: a basin of water next to running water (the sink) or a mist bath with a spray bottle. when misting a bird, do not aim directly for them, aim above them so the mist falls onto them. this is less stressful for reluctant bathers. for a p'let i would recommend an air-pumped spray bottle, so it produces a REALLY fine mist. big droplets can be a turnoff for somebirds.

3. rainfall/waterfall- this can be duplicated in the shower, on your finger. bathing is a flock activity, and many birds do not feel comfortable unless the flock is bathing too. less vulnerable- they need a "lookout" when they make themselves wet to feel safe.

4. leaf bathing. many species will rub themselves is sopping wet leaves to bathe. you can easily replicate this with sopping wet greens in a bowl!

hope that helps! experiment and see what you p'let likes.

3.
 

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Ours like method 4 - leaf bathing. My wife sets out a plate of wet spinach or bok choi (with a little extra water in the bottom). If they are in the mood they will frolic in it for quite a while - very cute.

If they need to be washed we implement 2./3. We have a hand held shower and spray them with lukewarm watter on the gentle setting, trying to avoid their beaks and nostrils. The boy hates it, the girl does't mind.

We shower them in a small cage, this allowes better control and keeps them from running/trying to fly (we want to avoid injury).

When done. We put them on one of our chests and cover them with a towel until they have had a chance to preen and dry - this keeps them from getting cold, and helps reduce the trauma as well as helps with bonding. It usually takes about half an hour to dry them.

Regards,

Art S.
 
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