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Hello. I have a female parrotlet which is about 1 year old and used to me. I owned her when she was 2 months old. I adopted a 3-month-old male parrotlet 2 days ago. Generally there is no problem, but from time to time my female bird pecks at the new bird and chases it. Is this normal during this period?
In addition, I found a calming and anti-stress product for birds. It contains calming herbs. Can this product help my female bird get used to the male bird and my new male bird get used to me?

The content of the product I am talking about:
Feed Additives per 1 L:
Passiflora extract 60.000 mg
Melissa extract 20.000 mg

stabilizers; propane 1,2 diol 75,000 mg

Can you help me? What can I do to facilitate this process?
 

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Welcome to the site.
parrotlets are territorial birds. They have been known to hurt and even kill each other in some situations. When introducing a new bird it is suggest to keep them quarantined at first keep the chance of disease down. Many do not do that but take the risk.
when first introducing I suggest separate cages with restricted supervised play time as they get used to each other. You are going to want some one on one training time with both birds but especially the new guy to help establish your bonds and relationships. The restrictions ped play time will give them time to know each other and give you time to observe their behavior. Be aware separate caging and play times may be necessary if the don’t get along at all. Usually separate sleep cages with supervised play time is the safest bet and what I ended up with on my last pair. My first pair were bonded male/female couple that shared everything.
 

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Welcome to the forum! There is a chance that your birds will not get along. You are bonded with the female and she is bonded with you. And if they survive each other, then you will have babies. Do you know what you are getting into? Nature will take its course.

If they are chasing, eventually the male will get bigger and may attack the female and this will not be a happy situation. But, he may die before that happens. I am just telling you this because I want you to understand that parrotlete are not compatible with each other most of the time. Yours may make it, but it is a stretch. Try what Ozzie says about keeping them away from each other and for you to have supervised playtime for them. Maybe you will beat the odds and succeed! I hope so. Keep in touch with us. We have a lot of experience in this forum! We care about you and your birds.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum! There is a chance that your birds will not get along. You are bonded with the female and she is bonded with you. And if they survive each other, then you will have babies. Do you know what you are getting into? Nature will take its course.

If they are chasing, eventually the male will get bigger and may attack the female and this will not be a happy situation. But, he may die before that happens. I am just telling you this because I want you to understand that parrotlete are not compatible with each other most of the time. Yours may make it, but it is a stretch. Try what Ozzie says about keeping them away from each other and for you to have supervised playtime for them. Maybe you will beat the odds and succeed! I hope so. Keep in touch with us. We have a lot of experience in this forum! We care about you and your birds.

David
Welcome to the site.
parrotlets are territorial birds. They have been known to hurt and even kill each other in some situations. When introducing a new bird it is suggest to keep them quarantined at first keep the chance of disease down. Many do not do that but take the risk.
when first introducing I suggest separate cages with restricted supervised play time as they get used to each other. You are going to want some one on one training time with both birds but especially the new guy to help establish your bonds and relationships. The restrictions ped play time will give them time to know each other and give you time to observe their behavior. Be aware separate caging and play times may be necessary if the don’t get along at all. Usually separate sleep cages with supervised play time is the safest bet and what I ended up with on my last pair. My first pair were bonded male/female couple that shared everything.



Hello, thank you very much for your answers. I've been observing my birds for a few days now. My newly adopted male bird is an extremely calm and harmonious bird. When I take it in my hand, it makes you love it without moving. My female bird may be displaying aggressive behavior because she is jealous of me. But so far they have not had a violent fight. It's just, every now and then, my female bird tries to peck at the male. But she's making progress. For example, on the first day, the female bird would not allow the male bird to eat, but now she allows. I also see them kissing each other from time to time. My female bird is not as docile as the male, but I don't think she will hurt him. And yes, I know they might have babies in the future. I gave probiotics, electrolytes and B vitamins supplements in the first days so that they can get through the getting used to each other easily and that their immunity does not decrease. First of all, my purpose in getting a mate for my bird was for my bird to have a friend. Because in my opinion she deserves this :). If the conflict between them escalates, I may switch to a two-compartment cage.
 

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I would definitely get a cage with a divider. You can get ones that have a removable divider so you can give them space and remove for together time. Also it's not a good idea to put the male into the female home. That is recognized as HER space. A new cage would help with the aggression some too I believe.
 

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I concur----don't trust the female to be calm around the male. Separate cages are best and watch from afar. I had a parakeet male in a separate cage, and when he and my male parrotlet were out together, I had to be right there to avoid any problems. There almost were. Both were about the same age at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would definitely get a cage with a divider. You can get ones that have a removable divider so you can give them space and remove for together time. Also it's not a good idea to put the male into the female home. That is recognized as HER space. A new cage would help with the aggression some too I believe.
I concur----don't trust the female to be calm around the male. Separate cages are best and watch from afar. I had a parakeet male in a separate cage, and when he and my male parrotlet were out together, I had to be right there to avoid any problems. There almost were. Both were about the same age at the time.
Thank you for your answers. As you said, I bought a double cage. Every now and then I remove the barriers between them and observe. They generally get along well, but I will continue to keep them in separate cages as a precaution. I have no production purpose. My purpose in getting a mate was for my bird to have a friend. Therefore separate cages is okey for me. If they get used to each other well, I can let them live together in the future. Because it is very enjoyable to watch them love each other :love:
 
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