Parrotlets Forum : TalkParrotlets banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, new member, new birb mom! I have a 10 week old Pacific Parrotlet, his name is Dino, and he has been an absolute delight! I am amazed everyday at his intelligence and growing personality, hope to be able to share my experiences and get helpful insight from the experience of all others! He has shown all of the “predictable “ parrotlet traits, yet, I’m quickly seeing his unique individual-ness. The one question I pose today is, how to correctly deal with the nipping, I know it’s a lot of his young age and it is not at all aggressive, but frickin’ ouch man!! I want to plan for positive training, please tell me it gets better, and what are the best ways to handle this time of development?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,893 Posts
Hello Dino and Dino's mom. Welcome to the site. We are glad you decided to join us on our journey of parrotlet / human ownership (who owns who is up to debate) Feel free to look around, ask questions and answer from your experience.
The nippiness is a big issue with parrotlets. It tends to get better as they get older. There are a few things to do but the method most of us have had success with is called Gentle Beak method. You can google to see lots of examples. Here is a link on here about it

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello Dino and Dino's mom. Welcome to the site. We are glad you decided to join us on our journey of parrotlet / human ownership (who owns who is up to debate) Feel free to look around, ask questions and answer from your experience.
The nippiness is a big issue with parrotlets. It tends to get better as they get older. There are a few things to do but the method most of us have had success with is called Gentle Beak method. You can google to see lots of examples. Here is a link on here about it

Thank you for the link! I have been (sort of) following that method myself so far, but not with as much conviction as I’m unsure and new at all this, but now I will follow through and continue this path of training 😀👍
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,152 Posts
Welcome to the forum! You have a bundle of energy, for sure. Dino is a true dwarf parrot, so you will have nipping from time to time. Once you get bonded, he probably will calm down a little bit. One thing, when he nips, try not to react by yelling, or raising your voice. I know they can hurt, but remain calm. If you react, then he wins! He will know how to hurt you or to be dominant over you. He can't help it!

Now, in a few months or so, Dino will probably go through what we call, " The Terrible Twos ! " His hormones will rev up and he may go into a biting mode! He won't stop until he gets over puberty. Some p'letts will skip this rage, but do not count on it. This happens anywhere from age 4 months to a year or so.

Just be patient and put up with it if it happens.

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I second the gentle beak technique. I used it so much it got to the point where my first little Parrotlet would say to me right away "Gentle" when I went to touch his beak, he knew. He was very very bitey the first few months. Biting is somewhat normal, especially when their wings are clipped. They are more Flight than Fight. Their first instinct is to fly away. But at 10 weeks I am assuming he came home from a breeder with his wings clipped. They tend to resort to biting because they are stressed. Allow him to bite, don't show any reaction. THEN back off and give the bird a few minutes and try again. Here is a really good video by the breeder I get mine from, watch his videos:

My new baby is sitting on my shoulder chirping at this after only 3 weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I believe much of the biting comes from their curious nature. Like an elephant uses his trunk or an octopus arm, they test their environment with the beak. I notice it with any new item, food or toy, they always use their beaks to investigate it or taste it. My boys never were very bitey, guess I’m lucky, but the beak method described works great. At early age I would gently touch their beaks and scratch all around their faces, and turns out they love it.! The method I use/d, varied slightly, in that I just gently grab their little beaks and whisper, “no bite”. Most important, do not overreact, you will only scare the bird even more. Also it’s important to remember NOT to reach into the cage to extract your bird. They need to know that cage is their home and safe spot and will not be violated. They will come out in their own accord if they want. Parrotlets are very territorial as it is, and some of the biting may stem from that, so do not breach their safe place unless necessary. This is a trust issue. Bird less likely to bite, when they trust you and your every action. My one bird will ride on my shoulder when I vacuum the floor, yet my 110 lb GSD will run and hide under the upstairs bed shaking and whimpering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for the warm greeting and helpful tips! Not too long after my post, the gentle beak method seems to already be sinking in with Dino-he’s testing my flesh with more care than before-lol! I know that it will go back and forth awhile, and he hasn’t even hit puberty yet, but he’s so smart! Already he’s working on his vocal abilities. I have a feeling that he’s not too far from his first words, he’s so chatty!
Anyhow, nice to hear from the experience of other owners, Dino and I appreciate it 😀
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top