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You can learn just as much on these forums and on Youtube which is free and just as good as books and videos you pay for.. I just get a kick out of some of the videos ive seen claiming to "Bond with your bird in hours", what a joke.. I just have to say my little Sweetpea is just the best and all it took for me to get him where he is now is PATIENCE and never forcing him to do anything. And now i dont even have to say step up, he just jumps on my finger.. The only thing im working on now is scratches.. But they have a mind of there own and you have to accept the way they are and cant force them to do what you want.. Just enjoy them even if they never fully bond to you..:D
 

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This thread is SO helpful!

If I could ask for a little bit of advice: I got a p'let that's almost a year old, and I don't think has been handled. This is his fourth day with me. Today I accidentally let him out; I forgot to latch one of the doors and it swung open while I was away, and he climbed out and started flying. I hadn't covered the windows completely, there were blinds sloping the wrong way for him to get traction, and he flew into the window several times before falling to the ground, and then did that again three more times, even after I closed the blinds all the way. I was worried he was going to hurt himself! Eventually he stayed on the floor so I sat down next to him and tried to be really comforting and calming, and eventually he backed into a wall but let me grab him, and put him back in his cage.

Before this, he was walking right up to me when I stood outside his cage, now he's just puffing up a little and watching me warily. I feel super dumb.

He also hasn't been eating much, even before this - he'll eat some seeds, a little bit of millet, and a bite or two of fruit but every time we take his food out to change it, not much has been touched.

Is there anything special I should do next? I understand being patient - I wasn't planning on letting him out for a while. I'm worried he'll be stressed and scared of me.
 

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...and of course, 20 minutes after posting that, I'm over next to him playing piano and he walks right back up to me inside his cage and starts pigging out on grapes and carrots.

I have the feeling getting to know my friend here is going to be a fun experience, haha. Lots of surprises.
 

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...and of course, 20 minutes after posting that, I'm over next to him playing piano and he walks right back up to me inside his cage and starts pigging out on grapes and carrots.

I have the feeling getting to know my friend here is going to be a fun experience, haha. Lots of surprises.
I expect mine to surprise me at least once a day. That way I am not surprised. :)
 

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Making progress - I've followed the first video, and I've gotten to where he'll eat millet with my hand right next to him. Which is pretty exciting, I think!

But I get to the part where I pull my hand away, and then in theory he steps out onto my hand to keep eating, and he keeps biting me really hard. I don't think it's aggressive, he moves very slowly like he's testing a new perch, but I guess I'm failing the test - he bites slowly but with a lot of force, and the most recent time he even drew blood a little.

I've gotten to that point three times, and each time when he bites me I take the millet away, but it keeps happening. Any ideas?
 

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Drawing blood and biting hard is biting. Testing is gentle. Tell him no and gentle beak. Do not let him know it hurts. Don't make a sound except a gentle no and gentle beak. Remember they love reactions and any loud noise is a reaction. Take the millet away and don't work with him again for at least a 1/2 hour. Don't punish but just ignore him. He may be stressed if you are working with him for any length of time. It should be the most 5 - 10 minutes a couple of times a day. Let us know
 

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Making progress - I've followed the first video, and I've gotten to where he'll eat millet with my hand right next to him. Which is pretty exciting, I think!

But I get to the part where I pull my hand away, and then in theory he steps out onto my hand to keep eating, and he keeps biting me really hard. I don't think it's aggressive, he moves very slowly like he's testing a new perch, but I guess I'm failing the test - he bites slowly but with a lot of force, and the most recent time he even drew blood a little.

I've gotten to that point three times, and each time when he bites me I take the millet away, but it keeps happening. Any ideas?
When I got my guys they had lost much of their tameness and very bitey and very scared of hands and fingers. I had a lot of luck doing what you are doing but I first had them step to the back of my hands. It made them more comfortable because they did not deal with fingers and palms that could grab them, it also is much harder for them to get a place on the back of my hand that they can get a good bite you on, so they stopped trying. Over time as they got comfortable with the back of my hands and more trusting of me in general it was fairly easy for me to just slowly coax them onto my fingers and palms. Now Jules has no problem running around on any part of my hands, back, fingers, palms, fore arms and will even go under my cupped hand for treats or other things that interest her. Bo is a little shier, but he was sick for a while and we lost some ground but he is catching up quickly once again. :D

Jules may bite me still occasionally when she get excited and forgets herself but mostly she behaves, or at least as much as a p'let ever does. :D
 

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Drawing blood and biting hard is biting. Testing is gentle. Tell him no and gentle beak. Do not let him know it hurts. Don't make a sound except a gentle no and gentle beak. Remember they love reactions and any loud noise is a reaction. Take the millet away and don't work with him again for at least a 1/2 hour. Don't punish but just ignore him. He may be stressed if you are working with him for any length of time. It should be the most 5 - 10 minutes a couple of times a day. Let us know
He doesn't seem to react to no or gentle beak...can I even start training gentle beak if he won't let me touch him in the first place?

I am keeping the sessions short - about 5 minutes each.

Edit: I realized that sounded a bit testy. I really appreciate the help! This is already so much more useful than the book I bought.
 

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He doesn't seem to react to no or gentle beak...can I even start training gentle beak if he won't let me touch him in the first place?

I am keeping the sessions short - about 5 minutes each.

Edit: I realized that sounded a bit testy. I really appreciate the help! This is already so much more useful than the book I bought.
No problem. Yes you can do it even if he won't let you touch him. I would say no and and put my finger towards his beak. Yes in the beginning he would lunge but little by little I got closer and was able to stroke his beak and then he would stop. Another method is distraction. Clapping lightly. Snapping your fingers. Something to deter the biting. Then go back to gentle beak if that is more helpful to you. That's why the hurricane method sometimes works but again you need to have him on you to do that. So any other distraction method that does no harm to the bird will work.
 

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No problem. Yes you can do it even if he won't let you touch him. I would say no and and put my finger towards his beak. Yes in the beginning he would lunge but little by little I got closer and was able to stroke his beak and then he would stop. Another method is distraction. Clapping lightly. Snapping your fingers. Something to deter the biting. Then go back to gentle beak if that is more helpful to you. That's why the hurricane method sometimes works but again you need to have him on you to do that. So any other distraction method that does no harm to the bird will work.
Awesome, thank you. Lots of possibilities, I'm sure I'll work it out!
 

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Well, this is what I do to get them to step up. Instead of pulling the millet away, I put a finger between them and the millet, so that they have to sort of lean over to get the millet. Once he's comfortable with that, I take the finger that he has to lean over and push into his belly and keep pushing until he either steps on (which most will) or he falls off the perch.
 

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Help

I've had my parrotlet Zoe for 5 months. She still isn't super friendly towards me. She is however becoming more friendly with my husband. My husband doesn't want anything to do with her. Yet she preens him and will willingly jump on his shoulder. I don't know what to do. Any ideas or advice?
 

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I've had my parrotlet Zoe for 5 months. She still isn't super friendly towards me. She is however becoming more friendly with my husband. My husband doesn't want anything to do with her. Yet she preens him and will willingly jump on his shoulder. I don't know what to do. Any ideas or advice?

I would have your husband ignore Zoe and have you try to entice her back to you with some goodies, like millet or hemp seeds (whatever she's willing to work for).
 

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While surfing a budgies site I often to go, (I have two budgies as well as my Parrotlet, Marco, and my cockatiel, Kermit), I noticed a thread on, "Millet Training".

Needless to say, after not having made much progress with Marco the first year I'd had her, I read on.

There were only 6 simple steps, and, along with a detailed explanation, there was a very instructive video placed on Youtube. So, I tried it.

Low and behold, Marco is now "investigating" my hand, eating not only millet but other "treats" such as lettuce, (not iceburg), and parsley from my hand, but she's also coming over when I'm sitting near her cage, and puffing up/watching my movements. She seems so much happier, and more interested in me!

So, I figured, after searching to see if there were any threads on here about it, that I'd post it for other struggling owners.

The Thread:http://talkbudgies.com/showthread.php?t=24092

The Videos:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkkT0i376rI
and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9B3x2dx_9hM

Hope this helps one or more of you guys the way it has helped me. :D
This is great for parakeets, but were talking parrotlets here. Two different issues.
 

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This is great for parakeets, but were talking parrotlets here. Two different issues.
Actually, it does help with parrotlets. We have a thread on millet training on the forum. The basics work from budgies to Amazons. It just that p'lets are a little harder to deal with as are the bigger parrots but it just more patience.
 

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My bird Zoe is 3.5 I've had her for 5 months. She was handled some by the previous owners. She steps up and will ride around on your shoulder or head if you put her there, but she still isn't very friendly. I talk softly to her and give her as much space as she wants. I give her millet when she is out of her cage. I just don't know. Is she a lost caused.
 

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My bird Zoe is 3.5 I've had her for 5 months. She was handled some by the previous owners. She steps up and will ride around on your shoulder or head if you put her there, but she still isn't very friendly. I talk softly to her and give her as much space as she wants. I give her millet when she is out of her cage. I just don't know. Is she a lost caused.
It depends on the bird's personality and its past, it also depends on you, your personality and the effort / resources you are willing to put into it. Are you working with the bird daily to socialize it?

We have 2, 3+ year olds that had lost their tames to the point that their last owner was chasing them down with a net, since they would run from her and bite her. We now have them potty trained, step up, they regularly land on us, play with us, one says pretty bird, etc. They are a work in progress but they have came a long way with us, so I can say that in some situations it is possible to get a good bird out of an older one. I am not sure they will ever be as trusting \ cuddly as a young one owner bird but we are trying and maybe one day we will get there. :)



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I take her out of her cage and have her ride around on me while doing chores, I talk to her all of the time. If I'm home her cage is open. At night I take her out to try to play with her and I read books out loud to her. I know it can be a slow process, but in 5 months I've only succeeded in getting her to step up to get out if her cage so I don't have to towel her anymore. I'm afraid she won't ever really warm up to me.
 

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It depends on the bird's personality and its past, it also depends on you, your personality and the effort / resources you are willing to put into it. Are you working with the bird daily to socialize it?

We have 2, 3+ year olds that had lost their tames to the point that their last owner was chasing them down with a net, since they would run from her and bite her. We now have them potty trained, step up, they regularly land on us, play with us, one says pretty bird, etc. They are a work in progress but they have came a long way with us, so I can say that in some situations it is possible to get a good bird out of an older one. I am not sure they will ever be as trusting \ cuddly as a young one owner bird but we are trying and maybe one day we will get there. :)

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You say yours are potty trained? How can I do that??? I would love to not get pooped on! :eek:
 

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You say yours are potty trained? How can I do that??? I would love to not get pooped on! :eek:
It was one of the early things we taught them and it turned out to be a lot easier than we thought it would. If you google "potty train parrot" there are a lot of instructions on how to do it. Basically it comes down to watching your birds body language, each bird has a tell they do slightly before they are ready to potty. When you see them make the tell then take them to where you want them to potty, praise and reward them afterward. In our case we have them going back to their cage. Since we taught this Jules has never potty on us or away from her area. Bo is at about 95% success, he will sometimes get into something and decide not to go back so we keep an eye on him and keep reinforcing.

It is sort of funny. We will be playing with them and they will suddenly fly back to the cage, go potty, get a little food or water, and fly back to play.


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