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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday evening, to say the least, was eventful.
I was cleaning Dodi's cage when he flew straight out of the door, something he's NEVER done before.
Dodi is about 7/8 months old and I bought him untamed, he will eat from my hand and let me stroke his
beak but we've been struggling with the stepping up, so getting him back inside the cage was... difficult.
I'm just so thankful that he is still alive and okay, he bumped slowly into the window (which was quickly covered),
he's been on the floor and on the curtain rails. I am still exhausted as he must be too after it all. We took his out of cage
time to build his play area and reposition his cage (pictured) - although we were unsure whether this would confuse him-, which he eventually flew to and we covered him with
a blanket and put him back into the cage (close to midnight). He seemed very happy on the curtain rail
though. He's sat on his perch happily now, feathers fluffed up and he's been eating as per usual. I
expected him to be a bit wary again and if I put my hand into the cage he does flutter around, so I suppose
my question is, is the trust completely lost after incidents like these?
His wings aren't clipped, which is fine because he's meant to fly but I know this can mean it's harder to train/control them. Will he need time to calm down and recuperate?
Any tips to training him or if I'm doing anything wrong would be appreciated as always!!!
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So, Dodi is a little escape artist, huh? It is amazing how fast they are – they can take off like a shot! All birds react to things differently, so it is hard to answer your question. Has he been acting normal, or does he seem more frightened and nervous than usual? If necessary, you might give him a few days to get over it. I know that Dodi came out of his cage on his own, but as just want to mention that (unless you do not want to tame your bird) it is recommended to get your bird used to your hands first before letting them out of their cage. You do not want your bird associating you with being chased around until they are back in their cage.

It sounds like it was quite an ordeal you had (I remember days like that) but I would recommend that you do not throw a blanket over him – they can be heavy, and a bird can be easily injured. Even a towel could injure a bird. Making a room darker by turning the lights down is a good way to get them back to their cages. They do not see well in the dark and so it encourages them to want to return to the safety of their cage. Cleopatra is hand tamed, but sometimes I need dim the lights down when she is being stubborn. Keep on working to get Dodi used to your hands – the millet sprig is a great way, then gradually move your hand closer and closer until he is sitting on your hand or fingers. It will make it a lot easier to get him back in his cage once you are letting him out (or if he makes another great escape). :rolleyes: Have you tried target training him? People use it to get their birds back into their cages. This is a good video on it.


I really like the playstation you made for Dodi! And the pic of Dodi on your curtain rod is very cute. He does look like he is having a good time up there! The little stinker! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you :) That's so helpful. I gently placed the blanket around him as he was perched on the shelf and I lightly put my hand around him.. so I don't think he was hurt but I know what you mean! I didn't want to startle him. He is a little stinker haha. He's let me touch his beak today and feed him his millet so I'm happy he's still happy. It wasn't supposed to be his first time out but he chose differently.
As it was the first time I had no idea what to do but dimming the lights and target training is a good start I think. Thank you :)
 

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One option I found that works when you have a little escape artist on the run is to dim the lights. Birds do not see as well as we do in dimmer lights and tend to settle down with dim light.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One option I found that works when you have a little escape artist on the run is to dim the lights. Birds do not see as well as we do in dimmer lights and tend to settle down with dim light.
I'll definitely try that if he ever refuses to come in his cage again.
 
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