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Ive been seeing so many posts about how to keep birds warm with the recent winter storms and want to share what I know! So some background on me- I have a degree in Biology; I have worked At Stone Lab in Lake Erie for their conservation sciences and in Michigan for the Vertebrate Zoology department for a local university.

So the most important thing with keeping a bird warm is understanding how they do it themselves: Basically how they do it is in their feathers they trap warm air, like a little air blanket (that's why you might see a cold bird puff up they're trying to store more warm air around them). They cannot do this if they're wet so KEEP THEM DRY.

All living things experience hypothermia in a way that their bodies are going to shut off "non-essentials" and prioritize usage to the heart, lungs, and nervous system. Muscles create heat when moving but also require a certain ammount of heat to work. Same thing with digestion- it requires heat to break down food. In birds, signs of being to cold are going to be lethargy, theyre going to slow down, eat less, and focus on breathing and pumping the heart. Watch their behavior, you want to make sure they're moving around, responding to you, vocalizing, eating, and drinking- if theyre too cold they're going to stop doing these things. We here in Michigan typically feed all of our animals more in the winter time becasue theyre burning more energy keeping themselves warm and it prevents them from losing heat to the point of no return. The most ideal natural situation is you genorate your own heat and then you keep that heat in.

What does that mean if you're in an area that could be experiencing winter blackouts? Parrotlets are pretty hearty and can handle the cold until around 65 degrees (that's being generous in an emergency they can go lower but I wouldn't risk it). The most beneficial thing for them is going to be keeping warm air around them. How can you do that?

Store bought products- heating pads, radiator heaters, and generators are the most ideal but if you cant get that hot water bottles, hand warmers, and metallic emergency blankets are going to be the next best thing. Not the problem with a hot water bottle is they create condensation as they cool, the temperature cant be regulated, and you need a way to heat the water. If you don't feel like starting a fire outside to heat water without power and your pipes freeze throw that out. Hand warmers and hot water bottles should always be wrapped in a towel. Once you have your heat source to warm the air you want to keep the warm air in around the bird (remember air blanket) that's where an emergency blanket is going to be the best for covering the cage and keeping the hot air in. I have fallen through the ice when working and the first thing they do is wrap you in an emergency blanket. If you cant get one materials like those used in wind breakers or winter coats can also help prevent the movment of cold air around your bird.

Alternatively, your body heat is also going to be your best friend. Snuggle your bird or put them in their travel case and cover up together (don't suffocate them by layering too many blankets though). Birds are neat because they can consolidate into a ball to conserve heat and cover their toes. Humans on the other hand lose most of their heat through the feet, hands, and head. Cover your extremities, snuggle your birds, maybe give them some extra treats, have a shot of whisky to warm the soul, and stay safe out there!

let me know if you have any questions and I will try to give my best scientist opinion!
 

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Also normally a puffed out bird is an issue. Not in case of cold. Then they lock feathers and puff like little balls. At the moment I have a downstairs porch full of doves that are little feathered bird orbs/balls hiding from the cold and the wind.
 
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