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I was in the bird store and saw two different (equally adorable :)) parrotlets. I won't get one of these two specifically (they're bonded). But, in general, what should I be looking for when I pick a parrotlet (I don't mind about color)?

One parrotlet was hanging back on his perch and seemed pretty wary of our presence in front of the cage. Once we had him out in a towel, he calmed down and seemed happy being handled and stroked gently.

The other one immediately flew to the front of the cage when we walked up and was eagerly trying to interact with us. When we put a finger up to the bars, it wasn't totally clear if she wanted tummy scratches or to take a finger off. When we had her out, she was pretty feisty and trying to wiggle out the breeders' grip. She wasn't exactly trying to bite, but probably would have if we let her.

So the question is: When it's time to pick a parrotlet, should I go for the more shy, less aggressive one or the feisty curious one? :confused: This is my first "real" parrot after lots of budgies, so I'm looking for one that's easier to train. I'd love a cuddly one too.

Thanks in advance. :)
 

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Hello, welcome!

Wow that's a hard question to answer! As you can see everybirdy is different, so it kinda depends on you and them.
I know sometimes a bird just kinda picks you, or you might have a special attraction to a shy bird, or maybe you want a fire cracker. :p
I can tell you if I found a parrotlet that was comfortable outside the cage with me and seemed more on the mellow side I would probably like this bird. Currently my 3 Parrotlets are one firecracker, one scaredy bird, and one goof ball. I would not change any of their personalities and I have a pretty diverse bunch.
Can you spend more time with them? That would be great. I didn't get to meet 3 out of 5 of my birds beforehand.
 

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If you can go back spend more time with them, I visit my local bird store and talk to the birds and I always find it interesting how different the personalities are with a clutch of birds.
 

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Hi and welcome!:)



If they had to put a towel on them, they are not TAME! You do not want a bird like a parrotlet who is not tamed. This means they were not hand raised. The one in the breeder's hands that was fighting the breeder is one I wouldn't get. Again, it looks like they are not tamed.


If you have had a parrotlet before and had one for a few years and were able to train it and bond with it, then you will know what bird you can handle.


If this is the first time you have owned a p'lett, then I wouldn't get the birds you just described.


You need a bird who has been hand raised and hand fed. A bird that hasn't been tamed is a very difficult bird and you will have a huge struggle getting them to bond with you. Parrotlets are true parrots and have the determination to be a hand full to a novice.
This is just my opinion from 40 plus years experience.


Here is a bird you want--- A bird who will get onto your finger and not fly away. You want a bird who is banded on the leg and purchased from a notable and reliable breeder ( Check with the Better Business Bureau ) and if they are not listed, do not do business with them. You want a p'lett who is at least 8-10 weeks old and not younger.


This is just my opinion.


David and Ricochet ( Ricco):cool:;)
 

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For a first time parrotlet, definitely get one who will easily sit on your hand. Even if they're not comfortable to receive scratches from you yet, a hand tame bird will happily sit on your hand and the breeder's hand with no issues.

My first p'let, Zazu, bonded with me quickly. When the breeder gave him to me, I was able to give him scratches after only a few minutes while he sat on my hand. With Luka, he didn't accept scratches, but he did happily sit on my hand and watch me while I talked to him. He flew back to the breeder for a moment and then settled himself in my mom's hair. Milo wasn't hand tame. He took about two months before I could easily hold him and give him scratches. Hand taming is rewarding but a lot of work with no guarantee they will become tame.

Side note, never give tummy scratches. Petting the body, wings, and back are sexually stimulating to birds. You'll increase their hormones and frustrate them when you don't follow through to sexy time. Only head scratches.
 
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