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Discussion Starter #1
I never knew America had a native parrot at one time! How sad that this gorgeous parrot is now extinct. What I found interesting is that this article states that some scientists consider the Carolina parakeet one of the top candidates for “de-extinction.” Yup. It may be possible to bring it back. And I bet you only thought that could happen to dinosaurs! lol

 

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Thanks for the info! I have seen this picture before when I visited my avian vet's office. The examining room he has for birds has a variety of bird pics on the wall. There were no names or classifications for the birds; just pictures. Now I know what America's only parrot looked like!
David🦜
 

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You're welcome, David! The next time you are in your vets office, you should ask him if he has ever heard about the Carolina parakeet. See what he says. You must be getting so excited about getting a new baby bird, huh? Coming up pretty soon, right?
 

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I am excited...nervous...worried if I can handle a baby...he will be here around April...I will know in a few days if he hatched. Last week, I received bad news about my heart. This Monday, I meet with the doctors to discuss how long I should have left. The doctors have noticed that I have been more upbeat lately. They asked me what was going on....I said, " A baby parrotlet is coming my way! " I had to explain what a parrotlet was....How do you explain one?! haha.

David🦜
 

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I it sad that the Carolina parakeet no longer exists. From everything I have read there really do not know why it died off. It is not like there was a large kill off as people ate them or used them such as what happened to the buffalo. What sort of amuses me is the same groups that decry the Carolina's demise are also upset about the modern day feral parrot populations that are trying to set up shop in the US today. Such as the Monk parakeets in Chicago, The Cherry-Headed conures in California, the Rosy-Faced Lovebirds in Arizona. The world is a large dynamic place, species come and go and move and evolve.
 

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The Carolina parakeet went extinct due to human factors such as extensive hunting during the last decades of the 19th century to obtain its feathers to decorate hats as well as habitat destruction.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I am excited...nervous...worried if I can handle a baby...he will be here around April...I will know in a few days if he hatched. Last week, I received bad news about my heart. This Monday, I meet with the doctors to discuss how long I should have left. The doctors have noticed that I have been more upbeat lately. They asked me what was going on....I said, " A baby parrotlet is coming my way! " I had to explain what a parrotlet was....How do you explain one?! haha.

David🦜
David, of course you have to make your health your priority, but I am still hoping that you and Vicki can get a baby bird in April. I think it would do you the world of good. I know everyone on this forum would love to see that happen. I have my fingers crossed that things will work out.🤞
 

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per your own article. “Still, the cause of its extinction remains contentious.”

I do not view a bit of pseudo science by environmental organizations begging for money as being much more proof than they want money. The organizations tend to view mankind as a blight on the planet and thus the source of all bad. I tend to view the world as a bit more dynamic in that most species died before the first human stood upright. In the case of birds, being prey animals whose very niche in the food chain is to be eaten chances are what really took them out was a new predator moving into their area or an old predator deciding they taste good. It would be interesting to see an examination of that aspect. Usually when these things are honestly investigated there is a hawk, falcon or owl that has changed its hunting range.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I it sad that the Carolina parakeet no longer exists. From everything I have read there really do not know why it died off. It is not like there was a large kill off as people ate them or used them such as what happened to the buffalo. What sort of amuses me is the same groups that decry the Carolina's demise are also upset about the modern day feral parrot populations that are trying to set up shop in the US today. Such as the Monk parakeets in Chicago, The Cherry-Headed conures in California, the Rosy-Faced Lovebirds in Arizona. The world is a large dynamic place, species come and go and move and evolve.
They have quite a lot of wild parrots here in Southern California. A couple of the species are endangered. They have been monitoring them since the 1960’s and they have not been invasive as expected because they are mostly in the cities and suburbs. Though I heard somewhere that they may be starting to nest in the local mountains. I think I mentioned once before on the forum that two large green parrots landed on the telephone line in front of my house once. Boy, they were noisy! That was in the 1990’s and they are still multiplying more and more. I am not surprised that there are people that want to get rid of them, but the only complaints most people have about them is that they are noisy. Go figure. lol
 

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Speaking of feral parrots. There is a good documentary about the cherry headed conures in San Francisco, California called "The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill" that is well worth watching. Not just about these parrots but also about flock dynamics and how bird flocks are quite unique in that there really is not a head of flock but some sort of constant hand off of who is in the lead that changes dynamically. In the case of the Telegraph Hill parrots they are mainly red headed conures but there were a few other species of parrots associated with the flock. You almost wanted to cheer as leadership passed back and forth among a flight and at one point the whole flock was taking its cues from a little budgie that for some reason the flock decided was the leader for a bit.

 

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Discussion Starter #11
The Carolina parakeet went extinct due to human factors such as extensive hunting during the last decades of the 19th century to obtain its feathers to decorate hats as well as habitat destruction.
Thanks, Jackie! It is a fact that millions of birds were killed to provide feathers for Victorian women's hats. Women even wore taxidermy hats in which they wore a whole bird. Geez, parrotlets would have been small enough to adorn those huge hats they used to wear! :eek:

If anyone is interested, this is an article on how bad it was.

Feathered Victorian Hats Decimated Several Species
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Speaking of feral parrots. There is a good documentary about the cherry headed conures in San Francisco, California called "The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill" that is well worth watching. Not just about these parrots but also about flock dynamics and how bird flocks are quite unique in that there really is not a head of flock but some sort of constant hand off of who is in the lead that changes dynamically. In the case of the Telegraph Hill parrots they are mainly red headed conures but there were a few other species of parrots associated with the flock. You almost wanted to cheer as leadership passed back and forth among a flight and at one point the whole flock was taking its cues from a little budgie that for some reason the flock decided was the leader for a bit.

Darn it, I was only able to watch a preview because it is currently unavailable in my area :(, but I have added it to my watch list and hopefully I will get to view it in the future. It looks great. Thanks, Ozzie.
 

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Great discussion, everybody! I love this! I have written a dedication page in the beginning of my book. It is partially dedicated to a parrotlet named BODIE. ( Remember him? He was a forum member and he passed away at age 18 years and 2 months old..I asked for permission to do this). Just before he died, I sent his human a question and answer sheet about Bodie.
NOW, I think I will add some information about the Carolina Parakeet as a closing remark to the dedication! I will read all that you have suggested so I can make some good sense about our long, lost species! Man!!!!This is some good conversation!

David and Vicki 🦜🦜
 

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There is definitely no "pseudo science" involved in the extinction of the Carolina Parakeet and DNA sequencing falls into the hard science category.

Farmers used the bird's natural behavior to shoot a couple of the birds, and then the entire flock would return and gather around the wounded birds. The farmers would then eradicate the entire flock that way.
The Extinct Carolina Parakeet
 

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There is definitely no "pseudo science" involved in the extinction of the Carolina Parakeet and DNA sequencing falls into the hard science category.

Farmers used the bird's natural behavior to shoot a couple of the birds, and then the entire flock would return and gather around the wounded birds. The farmers would then eradicate the entire flock that way.
The Extinct Carolina Parakeet
if this is your version of “science” then we are not going to get very far. While these articles are interesting anecdotal points, they are not what I consider actual science. We are just going to agree to disagree and let it go.
 
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There have been many species that have become extinct due to humans, so it is no surprise that the same thing happened with the Carolina Parakeet. It went extinct during a period of rapid industrial expansion. Here is the actual study mentioned by the article that JackieRTP posted.
 

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Here is some general info about the Carolina parakeet. Interesting it that they think it like to eat cockleburs and was generally considered to be poisonous to small mammals like cats.

The range study is interesting but a bit limiting. It is thought that the bird has been in North America for 5.5 million years. It may even be part of a species that originated out of South America. I wonder if the range data so far gathered is just the end of the species long run.
 

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Thanks for posting those 2 studies Two Parrotlets. Science X owns that website Phys.org - News and Articles on Science and Technology, which is where I shared that article from. They publish science, research, and technology news with a target audience of scientists, researchers, and engineers.

One of the things about Wikipedia is that anyone can share information. I can edit that Carolina Parakeet Wikipedia article if I wanted to, so the contents are only as accurate as what the person who posted it knew about.
 

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Thanks for posting those 2 studies Two Parrotlets. Science X owns that website Phys.org - News and Articles on Science and Technology, which is where I shared that article from. They publish science, research, and technology news with a target audience of scientists, researchers, and engineers.

One of the things about Wikipedia is that anyone can share information. I can edit that Carolina Parakeet Wikipedia article if I wanted to, so the contents are only as accurate as what the person who posted it knew about.
I never claimed Wikipedia as a fount of scientific knowledge. I specifically said it was "general info" and thus antidotal in nature. The point I have made is there have not really been any true investigative of the demise of the Carolina Parakeet and thus the cause of its extinction is mostly unknown and speculative in nature. It may be various factors that caused it but the collapse as rapidly as did occur indicate a possible predator, parasite or disease that ultimate caused its demise.
 
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