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Hi! As you know, I'm a very new member so I know nothing about Parrotlet care.
Could you tell me what there basic care is? :)

(Diet, Housing, Equipment, health etc)
 

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Diet:
25-45% pellets, 15-25% low-fat seed mix (millet, barley, anise, cantaloupe, flax, various grass seeds, greens, etc.), 30-50 percent fresh vegetables, grains, legumes, and fruits. Nutriberries are a good mix.

Housing:
12"x12"x12" is the minimum for 1 parrotlet. I personally don't think it's enough, I think 24"x12"x20" should be the minimum. Glass cages are not good, 1 million-1 billion birds die per year running into glass (thx @David Miller lol), And Parrotlets LOVE to climb.

Equipment:
Don't use the perches that most cages come with, the bowls are questionable but ok. Natural perches are the way to go, you can buy them or make them, you would sanitize them as you would for Meadow (Woah, I AM a stocker) Flock Talk has some good videos on setting up cages and making perches, DIYs, treats, diets, training, etc. Don't use toys with dyes or anything, they love to chew. Make sure a few toys have bells, one of their nicknames is 'bell birds' (again, thanks @David Miller)

Heath:
Avian Vets and bird specialists only, other vets usually have no idea what they're talking about. Dogs and Cats are completely different than a bird. always find a vet before you get a pet. I made that mistake and wasn't prepared when kiwi might have been sick (she's fine). They are good at hiding illnesses, so if they show the slightest sign of being sick, take them to the vet. They are very prone to URI, so put them in a place where you don't cook, light candles incents, etc.
ofc their is much more!
 

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Great post above!

You often have to switch up your lifestyle to accommodate a new bird. They are different from cats and dogs. That means being aware of all the potential dangers there are - e.g., air based dangers (candles, smoke, incense, essential oil diffusers, teflon (PFOA/PFTE), cleaning products, bleach, paint, self cleaning ovens [ovens on the self clean option, not regular use]), poisoning based dangers (e.g., houseplants, certain dyes, certain foods [avocado, coffee, chocolate, etc.]) and physical dangers (e.g., windows, doors, getting outside by accident, not sleeping with pets, squishing birds, ensuring children know how to handle pets, etc.).

I would advise stainless steel bowls, compared with plastic. Easier to disinfect and clean. You can use toys dyed with vegetable based dyes but usually avoid other dyes. My bird has no interest in bells, but some birds love them. My bird likes chewing toys made of yucca, balsa, or sola woods and cardboard/paper. You have to try out different toys to see what they like.

Be prepared to spend some £££ on things for them. Here in Canada at least, the vet bills are higher than dogs and cats, because as the other poster said, we see an avian specialist. About $200 CAN (£115) each visit for a checkup. It can vary.

In terms of other care, the one thing people often underestimate is the time commitment. Birds require companionship and time spent with them. It's a non-negotiable. You can go about your daily life but they will want to be involved, always. Always want to watch what you are doing. I take Monty to do things or I talk to him when I do stuff he can't be involved in. He particularly loves emptying the dishwasher with his Dad, and if we empty the dishwasher without him there is hell to pay! There is no hard and fast "you spent 1 hour exactly a day with them and they are happy", it all depends on your birds needs, what they have to do, if they have a companion bird, how much out of cage time they get, if you exercise them (i.e., are they flighted or not and if not, are you ensuring they have adequate exercise), if you take them to do things with you (e.g., we take Monty on car trips and to visit our family), and how much you directly interact with them (talking to them, doing tricks with them, playing with them, cuddles, scratches, etc.)

Parrotlets are on the relative scale, quieter than other birds but they are still birds, and are still very loud. Are you prepared for the noise level (you get used to it but some people really can't handle it, and that's ok). The other thing is, parrotlets are MESSY. VERY MESSY. They toss food and they throw toy bits around. When they preen they leave their dander everywhere. Small birds like parrotlets poop every 20 mins or so, which mean poop on your shirt, poop on your table, poop on your floor. I'm not sure I can emphasize how messy birds are until you have one yourself. I'm constantly cleaning up after him. This can be a problem for people with allergies.

There's a lot of good discussion on the forum about food and diet and cages if you take a peek around. Try using the search function too, it's pretty good!
 

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Previous posts cover a lot. A couple of other things.

Parrotlets are a very independent, very smart, very mercurial, creatures. They may cuddle with you one second and bite you the next. Ignore you one minute and turn into a velcro bird the next.
They are very small prey animals that everything on the planet either wants to eat or casually hurt and they know it. I say this to set an expectation. They take time and understanding to get to know. Some less and some more than others. They take patience, understanding and empathy to bond with and are many times worth the effort. But if you do not have time or you are not a patient person or you are sensitive to having failures to your wins then a bird may not be for you or it may not be a time in your life for them. Me, I found them later in life (around 50) when I was established and could spare the time, effort and money. They are the best pets I have ever had. I am on my third one and expect to have them as longs as I am able to.

Something else. You will get bit. At times maybe hard, even draw blood occasionally, but as you guys get to know each other it will be less times and not as hard. Mostly it is just a pinch but I notice it bothers some people more than others so it is best to know about it starting off.

Parrotlets are messy. They throw food everywhere. Expect to clean around their cage and perch spots regularly. It is mainly seeds and shells so you can vacuum it up quick but when eating a berry you will think they murdered something with juice everywhere. They also have about 3000 feathers they replace at least once or more a year so you end up with little feathers everywhere. After a good house cleaning I probably have enough feathers to build another bird. They stick with static so you can carry them around with you everywhere. I sat down at a business meeting once and one of Jules little blue feather wafted across the conference table. It was funny looking back.

They leave droppings (poop) about every 15 minutes. Parrotlets are pretty good about it in that they do not leave large messy ones like other parrots but more like little moist drop or pellet. Normally they do it around their perches so if you free flight around the house like we do we just make sure there is a towel or mat below their perch and on you if they perch for very long. It does not smell but you can smear it if you do not watch. You get used to it and it is not as bad as it sounds. Especially when compared to other birds or even worse the scat of other animals.

Chewing. All parrots chew most the time. You are going to need special clothes for around the house so your bird can chew on it. I have old shirts I call bird shirts. Basically my old pique polos that Rio can cling too, climb on, land on and chew the heck out of. I get a year or two out of a bird shirt so it is not all that bad. Some people wear sweaters or other things. The other issue with chewing is that jewelry becomes problematic. A parrotlet beak can clip a necklace remove and earring in no time flat. So you either give them up when you get one or you spend some time training them not to eat the enticing sparkly thing.

That should cover the negatives. I am not trying to talk you out of a parrotlet, quite the opposite. If you are up to the challenge a parrotlet is a wonderful privilege to own and be owned by. But it is better to know this going in. I did not but it worked for me. I hope it works for you too. They are wonderful little creatures that everyday make me laugh.
 

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You are getting great advice! Remember that the parrotlet is a flying parrot and they must fly to stay in peak health. I would never put a parrotlet in a cage that is less than 18 inches tall by 18 inches deep by 32-36 inches wide. You do not nee a tall cage, but a wide cage so they can fly back and forth. Now, if you are going to the vet, a small cage or a traveling cage is okay for a short while. If you are at home all day, then your bird can be kept in a smaller cage, as long as you let it out a lot during the day. You need to get a Play Station for him/her so they can fly to it and play.

Your lifestyle is important. Once you bond with your p'lett and you let him/her out of the cage to visit you or fly around, you can see what kind of behavior your bird has outside the cage. My p'letts loved to fly, fly, fly! They were fast! They got real good at it, too! Both Bogie and Ricochet would fly to my shoulder and chirp, chirp, chirp their little hearts out after a flying expedition! They loved it! They also found out that I kept little treats in my Tee shirt pocket. Bogie would climb down inside my pocket and stay for a while. This is why they are called " Pocket Parrots ".

I hope you are writing some of these suggestions on a tablet. It would be a wise thing to do.

David
 

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Chewing. All parrots chew most the time. You are going to need special clothes for around the house so your bird can chew on it. I have old shirts I call bird shirts. Basically my old pique polos that Rio can cling too, climb on, land on and chew the heck out of. I get a year or two out of a bird shirt so it is not all that bad. Some people wear sweaters or other things. The other issue with chewing is that jewelry becomes problematic. A parrotlet beak can clip a necklace remove and earring in no time flat. So you either give them up when you get one or you spend some time training them not to eat the enticing sparkly thing.
This is a good point. I have a rook piercing for that exact reason, Monty can't reach it from my shoulder/doesn't notice it. It was a strategically placed piercing (also my only one haha)
Not my ear but this is the piercing location. It's a good option for small bird owners like parrotlets.
Forehead Nose Face Hair Cheek
 
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