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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently I bought myself a pair of parrotlets - a girl Grechka and a boy Bulochka. They were not too young, vet supposed they are 1 y.o. or more. I gave them time to get used to a new home, tried to build trust and bond with them. I started with putting my hand inside a cage, more and more each time. Then I added a millet, offering it to them both. They agreed to eat it from my hand (the millet perch was long tho). After that I was trying with shorter perches, and with a sunflower seeds then. Grechka is now eating them from my fingers eagerly, but Bulochka is still afraid. The best result I have so far is that he doesn't run away scared when my hand with a sunflower seed is close. Although he's not comfortable with my hand near. I'm just not sure what do I do now, as Grechka is definitely ready to go further, I could start a target training with her, but Bulochka is still a bit nervous with my hand near. Isn't a month a bit too long, or is it ok and I just have to be patient and wait till Bulochka agrees to eat from my hand before going further with a training?
Here are these cuties, Grechka is blue and Bulochka is almost white
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What a cute pair. They are gorgeous.
You got one of them starting to warm to you, keep going. The other should follow in time.
You are at early times. I know a month seems like forever when you are just starting. We all do. But do not get wrapped up in time. Each bird is its own unique individual. A sentient being that remembers its past and applies those lessons. They are prey animals that almost everything on earth wants to eat or casually hurt and they know this in their instincts. It can take a while at first for them to make a decision to trust but they usually do. I know you want to love them and they want to be loved, given time and patience you will win out.

My first pair were rescues. It took about 3 months to get them so they were not terrified of us and come out of their cage. A little longer until they got hand tame. They were some of the best pets I have ever had and well worth the time that in retrospect was no time at all.
 

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Welcome to the forum! Glad you could join! Your couple look very healthy and they are beautiful p'letts. You are on the right track, so to speak, and soon, Bulochka will come around. They are a pair, so they have bonded with each other and you are the outsider. Have plenty of patience and it is possible that both birds will bond to you. It all depends on the birds. Do you want babies? Because if they are male and female, eventually they may have babies, nest or no nest.

David and Vicki
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you guys, your words really calmed me down. I will go on with being patient.
@David Miller no I'm not planning on breeding them, I'm not experienced enough for this, I suppose.
 

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Thank you guys, your words really calmed me down. I will go on with being patient.
@David Miller no I'm not planning on breeding them, I'm not experienced enough for this, I suppose.
you will be fine. The big key to parrotlets is pay attention to them. Interact with them on a regular basis. About an hour a day at least. They are little sentient beings that require TLC and respect. As long as you do that they tend to come around in time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Aaaand it happened! Slowly he's starting warming up to me. Yesterday he slowly and carefully but took a seed from my hands ) Today he was faster. It was very funny to see, how the first time I offered them both seeds, he was slow and unsure so girl took first and after eating it grabbed his seed too :) So the next time I offered them both seeds, he was quicker not to let her do this again :)
Group training has it perks ^_^
So now as I'm making the result stable, they can both enjoy "free" seeds. Soon we'll start target training with them and they'll have to work for the treats.
Here is one more photo of them, I call it "What'cha looking at?"
Bird Eye Vertebrate Beak Parrot
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Now I'm wondering why they won't come out of the cage tho. I thought the problem would be to put them back in cage, but actually they just don't come out when I open the door. And as they won't sit on my palm yet, I can't just take them out of it.
 

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Now I'm wondering why they won't come out of the cage tho. I thought the problem would be to put them back in cage, but actually they just don't come out when I open the door. And as they won't sit on my palm yet, I can't just take them out of it.
That one is not that unusual. The cage is their home and also their safety. Start decorating the outside of the cage. Especially around the door. So the outside looks a bit like the inside of the cage. Maybe move some favorite perches or toys to outside the door. Maybe put treats in a coop cup outside fairly close to the doors so they have to come out to get them. The big key is so the outside is not so different, not so scary and looks like the same safety as the in.

Chance are your putting them back in problem is yet on your horizon so you have that to look forward to when you get there. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Ozzie, I really appreciate your answers. You seem to know really a lot about parrotlets. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!
I also suppose that they were not treated well before I bought them. I bought them not from the breeder, but from the reseller, he proved to be not good enough towards the birds. I suppose he kept them in a small cage and didn't care too much about their food ration or about their safety. So I suppose they might not know what's it like to be outside (also they don't eat vegetables... and also Bulochka has an old wing trauma - possibly an old fracture, as vet said. Tho a guy tried to convince me that "She is totally ok, the wing is ok!" I just didn't care much, I mean I won't love her less because of the broken wing, so I bought her anyway). So maybe this is also the reason why they won't come outside.
 

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There are a bunch of us long time parrotlet owners on here. Usually you would get a lot more responses but I suspect with summer ending, school starting everybody is too busy to check in.

when was your first pic took? It looks like the birds are around 6 month ish then. They still have baby bird beaks and feet.

Did the reseller give any indication how Bulochka wing got hurt? Did the avian vet indicate how hurt the wing is? Do they expect Bulochka to fly ok?

With a bird pair you have to be on the lookout for aggression. Some pairs can live together but some pairs can aggress toward each other. Usually one bullies the other. If that happens then you will need to keep them separate with supervised play time.
 

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~~Hello!~~

You will get more responses soon. Ozzie is correct, people are busy right now. Is the injury on the wing stopping Bulochka from flying? He may flutter in the cage, but do you know if he can fly? They both feel safe in the cage and may have cage aggression towards your hands, so when you put your hands inside the cage, bring them in lower than the birds if you can. Try to keep your hands moving slowly. Let them know you are not a threat.

As far as fresh veggies are concerned, if they are young, they may not want to eat them. It may take many tries to get them interested, but keep trying! It is very important that they get fresh veggies as they grow. One trick I tried hundreds of times in my life of raising birds, I found that if you put a fresh broccoli floret between the cage bars, next to a perch where they sit, they will eventually get curious about it and try a taste. You can leave the floret out all day because it will not spoil, but will wilt a little. Replace it each day.

The key to success is by being persistent! Never give up! Blow your birdies a kissy kiss from me and my wife, Vicki! 🦜 🦜

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I actually amazed by the warm welcome I already got. It's relieving that there's a place I can ask questions and get help. Here, in Eastern Europe, where I live, parrotlets are not widely known, actually all of my friends only first heard about them from me.
when was your first pic took?
About a month ago.
Did the reseller give any indication how Bulochka wing got hurt? Did the avian vet indicate how hurt the wing is? Do they expect Bulochka to fly ok?
This reseller is a kind of a guy... We call them "baryga", I'm not sure if the english equivalent is a huckster - the guy who's only goal is to sell, who doesn't care much about what he's selling, can even cheat or lie to achieve his goal, doesn't care about his birds etc. He was trying to convince me that "the wing is ok, it just seems that it's not" etc. So no, this one was of no help. The vet said it's most likely an old fracture. He examined it, said that it doesn't hurt anymore, as Bulochka responds similarly to him examining this wing and another one. And most likely she'll never fly again :(
With a bird pair you have to be on the lookout for aggression. Some pairs can live together but some pairs can aggress toward each other. Usually one bullies the other. If that happens then you will need to keep them separate with supervised play time.
They didn't show a signs of aggression by now. They actually are one of a pair, they are so cute together. They rub each other, they sit very close. Long story short - I brought Grechka home first, and Bulochka the next day only. You should have seen how they reached towards each other when they finally reunited! It was even a little heartbreaking to see. And when we were to the vet, after he examined Bulochka and put her back in cage - she reached to Grechka so fast, and only calmed down sitting next to him, her head hidden in his neck feathers. They are really close.
I also typed it wrong in the first message, the boy is a white one, but his name is Grechka (or Grechik), and the girl is blue and she is Bulochka (bun in russian).
Is the injury on the wing stopping Bulochka from flying? He may flutter in the cage, but do you know if he can fly?
Unfortunately, she can't fly :(

if you put a fresh broccoli floret between the cage bars, next to a perch where they sit, they will eventually get curious about it and try a taste. You can leave the floret out all day because it will not spoil, but will wilt a little. Replace it each day.
Thanks for the idea, I will try!
Blow your birdies a kissy kiss from me and my wife, Vicki! 🦜 🦜
🥰
 

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The not flying thing is a bit of an issue. Birds are made to fly and do best for both mental / physical health when they can. It is how they get their exercise. Still compromises can be made and this is not the first time we have run across handicapped birds or birds that have been clipped so they can not fly for safety or behavior reasons. Birds are quite adaptable. Just make sure to have more perches, ropes, strings, netting and other changes to the environment so the non flight bird can adapt easier. Also wear clothes sort of like knit sweaters or pique shirts that are easier for them to climb around on without losing grip. Thinking on it, one bird not being able to fly could work your way as you go since the non flighted bird is going to need you to move around and will want to be on you more. You may end up with a pair of Velcro birds in time. :):):)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Today I started target training with them, and it actually went quite well! It seemed they got the conception of training overall - I mean the idea that "you want a treat - you need to do smth", and I started with giving them treat when they just looked at the stick, and in 2 training sessions they moved to "biting the end of a stick". And girl Bulochka was much faster, Grechik had to keep up to her to get some treats as well, otherwise they'd all go to Bulochka. Quite often she gets her treat first, eat it - Grechik is still thinking - after that she bites the stick again and gets another treat - only after that Grechik would also bite the stick as it's been already 2 treats passing by him to Bulochka. I'm very glad with the results. Also they started paying more attention to me, they listen actively when I come to talk to them, calling them "good boy", "good girl" etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As far as fresh veggies are concerned, if they are young, they may not want to eat them. It may take many tries to get them interested, but keep trying! It is very important that they get fresh veggies as they grow. One trick I tried hundreds of times in my life of raising birds, I found that if you put a fresh broccoli floret between the cage bars, next to a perch where they sit, they will eventually get curious about it and try a taste.
And this also worked at a first try, thank you for the advice! Bulochka started eating it just an hour after I left it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Today I put them "parrotlets sounds" on Youtube, and they respond very actively, they started chirping along with the video pretty loudly, jumping across the cage. I just a bit worried if it's good for them, maybe they... like I don't know, miss other parrots, or maybe they want to see this "other birds" making these sounds, and if they don't - it causes some stress, or anything else... Do you know anything about it?
 

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That one is not that unusual. The cage is their home and also their safety. Start decorating the outside of the cage. Especially around the door. So the outside looks a bit like the inside of the cage. Maybe move some favorite perches or toys to outside the door. Maybe put treats in a coop cup outside fairly close to the doors so they have to come out to get them. The big key is so the outside is not so different, not so scary and looks like the same safety as the in.

Chance are your putting them back in problem is yet on your horizon so you have that to look forward to when you get there. :rolleyes:
I never thought of this! I’m going to also try making the outside of Scooter’s cage more appealing!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Wow. It seems, my p'lets are afraid of the red color.
Yesterday I tried to put a rope perch inside their cage, but they seemed terrified of it when I was only bringing it to the cage. And today I bought pellets to try and switch them on eating pellets, and they were of different color including red. And I took some to make them try - they ran away terrified, like really terrified. Then I tried to feed them pellets one by one, they were ok with green, brown, orange (didn't like it tho but were not afraid), and when I tried red ones - they reacted the same way again, they were scared and rushed away from my hand instantly.
 

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You're doing great, just keep doing what you're doing! It definitely is a little bit harder sometimes with parrotlets who are a little older or not super tame before. I brought a 10-month-old home from a pet store, he took a pretty long time to warm up to us and even then he just stayed pretty skittish for the entire time that we had him. He was a super lovable little guy though, he passed away unfortunately and I miss him so much. Their personalities are all different so even if he kind of stays a little more shy or skittish don't worry about it. You never know when it might turn around!
 
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