Good idea to keep breeding Parrotlet's in same room as pet parrot? - Talk Parrotlets Forums



User Menu
Forum Home
Parrotlet Gallery
Today's Posts
Log In
Register now!
Search



Advanced Search
Forums
Parrotlet Talk

Parrotlet Housing

Do It Yourself

Parrotlet Pictures

Your Parrotlet's Health

Parrotlet Diet

Training and Bonding

Parrotlet Breeding

Parrotlet Articles

Parrotlet Rainbow Bridge

Parrotlet Vet Listing

Chit Chat

Site Discussion

Talk Network
Talk Budgies
Talk Cockatiels
Talk Parrotlets
Talk Parrots

Go Back   Talk Parrotlets Forums > Parrotlets > Parrotlet Breeding

Parrotlet Breeding If you're interested in breeding your parrotlets, this is the place for you!

Notices

Good idea to keep breeding Parrotlet's in same room as pet parrot?

This thread has 5 replies and has been viewed 1364 times.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-16-2019, 12:59 AM   #1
Chances
Junior Member
 
Chances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Brisbane - Australia
Posts: 7

Experience: Parrotlet Enthusiast

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 0
Chances is on a distinguished road

Good idea to keep breeding Parrotlet's in same room as pet parrot?

Hi all, looking for some suggestions about the best place to house some Parrotlets I intend to buy / breed soon.

I have a pet Quaker parrot who lives in my lounge room, his cage is open all day long so he can get to his play area which is on a stand beside the cage. He never flys around or leaves this area unless its by me carrying him.

I originally intended to build a walk in aviary in the backyard to house 4 Parrotlets until I learned that they need to be split up when breeding or if they dont get along etc...

So I changed my mind and im now thinking to setup a cage inside the house on the opposite side of the lounge room where my pet parrot is.

There would be a good 6 meters / 20 feet separating the cages if that helps.

I dont think the Quaker would get jealous as I wont be handling the Parrotlets much at all but perhaps he will be upset that their invading his space?

Or perhaps the Parrotlets might not be comfortable with the Quaker in sight 24/7 across the room from them?

Does this even sound like a good idea ?

Thanks !
Chances is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-16-2019, 12:57 PM   #2
David Miller
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Orlando
Posts: 4,029

Parrotlets Owned: one
Experience: Parrotlet Owner

Karma: 255
Rep Power: 18
David Miller is a jewel in the roughDavid Miller is a jewel in the roughDavid Miller is a jewel in the rough

Thumbs up

I see no problem at 6 meters. I would suggest that you cover the p'letts at night...they do need 11-12 hours of quiet and darkness per day.



P'letts need to be located in the busy ( central ) part of the house. If your Quaker lands on their cage, p'letts will attack his feet with gusto!


Your Quaker may be territorial, but I will bet he will accept the noise and presence of the mated parrotlet pair. I had a cockatiel and 4 budgies living in close surroundings one time and they tolerated each other well. From what I have observed and read, parrots are happy to have other parrots around as long as they do not feel their territory is being trampled on. The place where I get Ricochet's bird food has a small room that has 4 different kinds of parrots in cages. They get along fine. You should hear them talk to each other! They have 3 cages with 2 p'letts in each cage, a Quaker, a Green Amazon, and 2 Green cheeked Pineapple conures.


David and Ricochet
David Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2019, 11:13 PM   #3
Chances
Junior Member
 
Chances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Brisbane - Australia
Posts: 7

Experience: Parrotlet Enthusiast

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 0
Chances is on a distinguished road

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Miller View Post
I see no problem at 6 meters. I would suggest that you cover the p'letts at night...they do need 11-12 hours of quiet and darkness per day.



P'letts need to be located in the busy ( central ) part of the house. If your Quaker lands on their cage, p'letts will attack his feet with gusto!


Your Quaker may be territorial, but I will bet he will accept the noise and presence of the mated parrotlet pair. I had a cockatiel and 4 budgies living in close surroundings one time and they tolerated each other well. From what I have observed and read, parrots are happy to have other parrots around as long as they do not feel their territory is being trampled on. The place where I get Ricochet's bird food has a small room that has 4 different kinds of parrots in cages. They get along fine. You should hear them talk to each other! They have 3 cages with 2 p'letts in each cage, a Quaker, a Green Amazon, and 2 Green cheeked Pineapple conures.


David and Ricochet

Thanks for the reply David, sounds like I have a chance at not causing a drama then !
I have seen 2 different opinions on how you should introduce the Parrotlets into their cage.
One view was to let the male in first for a few days before the female and others have said vice versa.

I'm assuming the best would be to use a cage with a divider and just make sure theyre not arguing like mad before letting them together ?

Just looking into the different genetics at the moment, would appreciate your thoughts on the best combinations of parents - or more importantly which mutations are a bad idea to breed.
Will spend some more time today looking into it. There are a few cheaper Parrotlets for sale but im not sure if it will be worth spending the extra (3x as much) on a particular mutation.

Not worried about resell value, just want the healthiest babies possible.

Cheers!
Chances is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-18-2019, 07:01 PM   #4
JackieRTP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Raleigh/Durham, NC
Posts: 986

Parrotlets Owned: 1
Experience: Parrotlet Owner

Karma: 28
Rep Power: 15
JackieRTP is on a distinguished road

Genetics are extremely important when breeding parrotlets. Do not breed red eyed birds together as this will result in blindness in the babies. It is also not recommended to breed the same visual color mutation to one another (for example a blue mutation to another blue mutation). I would suggest knowing at least the genetics of the parents of the birds that you plan to pair together, if not 2-3 generations.
JackieRTP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2019, 09:02 PM   #5
Chances
Junior Member
 
Chances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Brisbane - Australia
Posts: 7

Experience: Parrotlet Enthusiast

Karma: 10
Rep Power: 0
Chances is on a distinguished road

Quote:
Originally Posted by JackieRTP View Post
Genetics are extremely important when breeding parrotlets. Do not breed red eyed birds together as this will result in blindness in the babies. It is also not recommended to breed the same visual color mutation to one another (for example a blue mutation to another blue mutation). I would suggest knowing at least the genetics of the parents of the birds that you plan to pair together, if not 2-3 generations.
I may have rushed into getting the female plet...
They seem to be getting along great, its unfortunate that I will have to split them up, its only been a few hours since they first met so I guess it wont be too bad.

Should I see if I can swap either of them for a green preferably ?
Or - not an albino, fallow or blue.

Bugger, I read heaps and even on genetics but I totally missed that part
More reading to do ...

I attached a picture of the male and female I brought, unfortunately I do not know their history too well.

Edit: I did just check with both breeders I got the birds from, they did not get any birds from eachother. They mentioned the situation was a little different in Australia than the USA.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20191020_095039.jpg (85.5 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg 20191020_095104.jpg (68.5 KB, 5 views)

Last edited by Chances; 10-19-2019 at 09:57 PM..
Chances is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2019, 05:02 PM   #6
JackieRTP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Raleigh/Durham, NC
Posts: 986

Parrotlets Owned: 1
Experience: Parrotlet Owner

Karma: 28
Rep Power: 15
JackieRTP is on a distinguished road

Yes, the gene pool in the US is very weak and it is extremely expensive to import birds. Although I have heard about not breeding the same visual color mutation to one another before, I found the information referenced at the following link. Sandee Molenda is a retired parrotlet breeder who started the International Parrotlet Society (which unfortunately no longer exists). She also has a book out called "The Parrotlet handbook". http://forums.avianavenue.com/index....rotlets.88086/



Breeding Color Mutation Pacific Parrotlets
By: Sandee L. Molenda, C.A.S.

It is important for anyone that wishes to breed color mutation Pacifics to spend a little time investing in planning and educating themselves before they buy their first pair of color mutations. This is both to protect the potential breeder from disappointment and to produce the healthiest, strongest color mutations possible.​
One must remember that color mutations are, by definition, genetic abnormalities. They are desired genetic flaw, namely new color plumage that is not found on 'normal' or wild-type parrotlets. Breeding color mutations is done by perpetuating these desired genetic flaws. While we hope that we are only replicating the abnormal color gene, there is a risk other, not so desirable genetic flaw are also being produced. This especially true when working with new or recently introduced color mutations. That is the main difference between Pacific parrotlets and other types of hook bills that have long established color mutations such as lovebirds, budgies, Ring necked parakeets and cockatiels. Those birds have been bred for hundreds or even thousands of generations while parrotlet mutations have only been in the United States for around a decade or less. With care and consideration, however, one can produce color mutations that are just as strong and healthy as normal wild-type parrotlets. ​
The first rule of thumb is to try and avoid breeding related parrotlets as much as possible. This means do not breed father to daughter, mother to son or the worst, brother to sister. This is called "inbreeding". There is a reason in humans it is illegal to marry a relative and it is because of the high probability of genetic birth defects and it is the same in birds. In parrotlets, even breeding cousins is frowned upon and should be avoided. This is called "line breeding". While there may be circumstances under which inbreeding and line breeding may be utilized but it should only be done by genetics experts working with severely endangered, rare species or new spontaneous mutations that understand the risks and how to avoid them by 'out-crossing' to normal, wild-type parrotlets. ​
The next thing to avoid is breeding the same visual color mutation to one another. An example would be to breed a blue mutation to another blue mutation. While this is acceptable with other types of color mutation birds, parrotlets have not been bred long enough to eliminate genetic flaws with this type of breeding. This type of pairing can produce a variety of congenital and/or genetic problems such as low fertility, infertility, high instances of dead in shell embryos, smaller clutches, abnormally sized chicks, higher chick mortality rates, failure to thrive, offspring with weakened immune systems, abnormal feathers, birth defects and lethal genes. ​
Along those lines, one should never breed a red-eyed bird to another red-eyed bird. Even with other types of birds, one never should breed red-eyed birds together. This means fallows, albinos, cinnamons and lutinos should never be bred together. Severe birth defects have been known to occur such as blindness, absence of eyes and death. ​
Finally, it is important to also have normal wild-type Pacific parrotlets that are completely mutation-free to outcross with your mutation birds. This is the only way to ensure health, strength, vigor and vitality to your mutation lines. Otherwise, after a few generations, you can end up with a 'genetic bottleneck' with birds that have numerous genetic and increasingly severe genetic flaws.​
Breeding unrelated double-splits, using yellow and blue, is as follows:​
6.25% GG
12.50% BG
12.50% YG
25.00% GYBW
6.25% BB
12.50% BW
12.50% YW
6.25% YY
6.25% WW​
GG = Normal Green
BB = Visual Blue
YY = Visual Yellow
WW = Visual White
BG = Blue Split
YG = Yellow Split
BW = Blue Split to White
YW = Yellow Split to White
GYBW = Green Split to Yellow, Blue and White​
JackieRTP is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


REMEMBER TO VOTE FOR US DAILY!

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:23 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2006 - , 2403 Networks LLC, All rights reserved.