What Do Parrots Say to Each Other in the Wild? [Archive] - Talk Parrotlets Forums

: What Do Parrots Say to Each Other in the Wild?


Callie
07-27-2011, 09:37 AM
http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/12846043/28485188/name/parrots_talk_science2011.pdf

Very interesting article about Parrotlets!

Evelyn
07-28-2011, 10:02 PM
Callie, thanks for posting that, it is very interesting. Can you imagine, living like that, being able to see Parrotlets wild and free?

gvoigt
07-31-2011, 12:20 AM
Ya. I always wondered about that. Parrot 'talk' involves a lot tonal changes, variations in 'song'..Basically a rapid fire 'talk' with a high degree of modulation. That implies that a huge amount of information is being expressed.

RookieBlue
07-31-2011, 08:17 AM
Wow, that's quite incredible, actually. I wonder if, to take these babies from the nest early, and start teaching them human language - they would be able to understand what they are saying, when they say it. I know many birds who appear to actually understand the meaning behind their words i.e. "Hello" as a greeting, etc.

b_c
07-31-2011, 10:30 AM
Great read! Thanks for the link!

thesillybanana
07-31-2011, 03:21 PM
That was fantastic, thanks for the link!

perish_song
07-31-2011, 07:11 PM
I was totally just about to post this! :D Very interesting, huh? The picture on the first page of the babies is precious, hee. I want to go to Venezuela to see wild parrotlets, now!

b_c
07-31-2011, 07:30 PM
Do you think if these pet parrotlets were left in the wild, they would be able to learn those contact calls and be able to survive?

perish_song
08-01-2011, 12:28 AM
Do you think if these pet parrotlets were left in the wild, they would be able to learn those contact calls and be able to survive?

I dunno, it sounds like it's something babies have to learn from their parents. Maybe they could adapt, maybe, but in what seems to be a very structured/organized social sphere, I think it's highly unlikely.

Callie
08-01-2011, 12:33 AM
Do you think if these pet parrotlets were left in the wild, they would be able to learn those contact calls and be able to survive?
No. Even though parent raised babies have the advantage of being raised by their parents, there are still skills necessary to survive in the wild that are not passed on. One of the main things is what's edible. Another is recognizing predators.

There are breeding programs that breed certain types of parrots with the intentions of releasing them back into the wild and, from the few I've read about, survival rate of those released youngsters is not good.

b_c
08-01-2011, 12:40 AM
So, my next question is how many of these 'pet' parrotlets that we have are originally wild caught birds? How do we contribute to this "parrotlet poaching" ?

Callie
08-01-2011, 06:18 AM
The pet parrotlets we have here in the US at the moment are probably decendents of wild caught ones but the commonly seen species are domestically raised. The Wild Bird Conservation Act of 1992 effectively ended the importation of most parrots and some breeders, including myself, have had problems getting unrelated breeding stock for certain species of parrot. Birds can be imported but there's a long, complicated process to go through and it's not cheap.

Jinx n Noodle
08-01-2011, 08:42 AM
Wow, very interesting:)

b_c
08-01-2011, 03:28 PM
Interesting! I somehow still feel responsible. If it were not for the original demand by pet bird lovers, maybe many species would not be endangered? :S

Callie
08-01-2011, 04:35 PM
While pet trade has had an impact, it's not the only contributor to the decline of parrot species in the wild. Pollution, loss of habitat space and just civilization (increase in human population) have all had impacts on the decline of parrot species in the wild. There are many endangered species in the wild that are doing quite well being bred in captivity. Two that come to mind off the top of my head are the Black Cheeked Lovebird and the Sphix Macaw.

I've not checked CITIES status for parrotlets but I'll see what I can find.

ninjacherry
08-01-2011, 06:37 PM
That was really interesting read, thank you for sharing!

skthurley
08-02-2011, 01:28 AM
Fascinating!

Thank you for sharing!

The intelligence of parrotlets just made me love them even more

Pauliesmom
08-02-2011, 02:19 AM
That is a very interesting article

sourberry
08-23-2011, 02:19 PM
fantastic article! Loved the video of the slowed down speech

Bernfont
01-31-2012, 08:10 PM
I just read the referenced article and I agree, it was very interesting. I highly recommend a book which many of you may already have read: Alex & Me by Irene Pepperberg. That bird, Alex, never ceased to amaze me!

It was also exciting to read about parrotlets in the wild. The research sounded very interesting and I hope to be able to find more about the study.